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Bermuda Flag

Bermuda's Railway Trail

Scenic walking and pedal cycle area follows where train operated from 1931 until 1948

line drawing

By Keith Archibald Forbes (see About Us) at e-mail exclusively for Bermuda Online

To refer by e-mail to this file use "bermuda-online.org/railway" as your Subject

Bermuda by rail 1930s

Bermuda Trade Development Board postcard 1930s. Train on Front Street, outside what was then the Colonial Secretariat Building.

Bermuda  Railway tourism map 1931

Courtesy the late Joseph J. Outerbridge and Bermuda Trade Development Board (TDB), precursor of the Bermuda Department of Tourism. This map of the Bermuda Railway was issued by the TDB to mark the railway's October 1931 debut. 

Bermuda railway going over a coastal bridge

Bermuda Railway going over a coastal bridge, circa 1946, colorized B&W photo by M. B. Parker, used with non-transferable permission.

Railway terminal

Railway terminal, Pembroke circa 1946 (until 1948, when railway left, after which it became the bus terminal), colorized B&W photo

Introduction

Update. October 1, 2013. It was announced that a pedestrian bridge over Bailey’s Bay is hoped to revitalize the eastern end of the historic railway trail. Tucker Murphy, of Friends of the Bermuda Railway Trail (FBRT), said that the Bailey’s Bay bridge project is the result of a partnership between Government and the group, with FBRT raising the funds for the around $500,000 project. “The idea of the Bailey’s Bay project is it links just over three, 3.5 kilometers of trail. It would use the historical length of the railway trestles going across the bay, so we hope it would be very low impact on the costal foreshore area. The funding has been raised privately through FBRT, and it’s in partnership with the Parks Department, who are driving the project on the Government side. The FBRT has been working with Government for more than a year and a half on improving the trail, and has already seen some success in the western end of the Island. We kind of tested the relationship with improvements to the West end of the trail last fall. We put tons of mulch on some of the more traveled areas like Ord Road and by the Fairmont Southampton. We also put down wheeling ramps for cycles on some of the steeper areas. We put trash cans on the trail and we put benches. It’s grown from there. We’ve got a number of private donors who have joined us under the umbrella of FBRT. Research has shown that the more connected sections of the trail in Paget and Warwick receive more than ten times the traffic than the section in Hamilton Parish. It’s probably 70 to 100 people per week versus more than 1,000 in Paget. If you look at the length of each of the trails, it’s probably about 6km of continuous trail there, while the Hamilton Parish segment is much smaller. Around 2km, and it leads to a dead end. Connecting the segments that stretch between Crawl Hill and Coney Island will create an unbroken segment of trail more than 3km in length, which would hopefully encourage more people to use the trail for walking and cycling. In 2003, Government reconnected Shelly Bay to Flatts using these six prefabricated bridges. We thought that was a good example of a successful project on the trail, and we’re trying to replicate something similar in Bailey’s Bay. We think the trail is a great asset for free recreation and a place where people can go to walk or seek respite after work. We looked at studies in the US and the UK on rails to trails projects, and they found that for about every dollar you invest in a trail, you get about $3 return in terms of health benefits. Along with the health benefits, the trail also carries tremendous cultural and tourism value, links to numerous historical sites and boasts fantastic views of the Island. We believe it’s not only a useful link, it’s also a beautiful section of trail and this link would give access to many more people. We will be making the bridge as non-intrusive visually as possible. Our view is to minimize the intrusion, to make it blend as much as we can with the natural landscape.”

Bermuda railway trail by push bikeSound the train once made (right). train.WAV. The Bermuda Railway Trail ("the Trail) is owned by the Bermuda Government. There is a free illustrated walking guide, issued by the Bermuda Government and available only from the Visitors Service Bureau of the Bermuda Chamber of Commerce in the City of Hamilton or Town of St. George. Visitors should go in person to get a copy as it is not available online by PDF from any Bermuda Government website.  Also, read the two definitive histories of the line from the early 1930s to its ending in 1949. 

In 2000, the Bermuda Government's Parks Department - at 169 South Road, Paget DV 04, P. O. Box HM 120, Hamilton HM AX, Bermuda - a division of the Ministry of the Environment -  took over administration and management, to enhance it as an eco-tourism attraction. All visitors should phone the Parks Department at (441) 236-4201 or fax 236-2711 for all enquiries relating to the Trail. 

Features include a generally motor vehicle-traffic-free (except for a very limited section in the Sandy's Parish area where the Railway Trail is paved and mopeds/scooters may be allowed) bikeway and walkway, very rare in Bermuda with over 3,400 residents per square mile.

Please note that this trail is not uninterrupted. In quite a few places it is interrupted by main and usually busy roads, some with no sidewalks or sidewalks on one side only. It follows most of the former rail track, with newer signs added in 2008 and sometimes stops abruptly. It is uneven in places, has steps, and only able walkers can more safely or nimbly negotiate streets or roads crossing or running from the trail, often without sidewalks. The City of Hamilton in the centre of the island and Town of St. George (St. George's) to the east are 12 miles from each other (but it seems much more than that to the pedal cyclist) both lost their part of the trail many decades ago and are at least two miles way from their nearest parts of the trail. On the western side of Bermuda, the Royal Naval Dockyard in Sandy's Parish is also several miles away from the nearest part of the trail. These present challenges to the visitor, in particular those who arrive by cruise ship. For those who want to rent push bikes/pedal bikes it means care must be taken to rent from bike livery places that will cater to the needs of the visitor in getting them to and from the trail. Parts of the trail are paved, as mentioned earlier, but the great majority is unpaved. 

But to make up for these challenges, there are gorgeous marine views in many places.  The Trail is wonderful for cyclist or the able walker or runner and the slower walker with no mobility problems. It is not good for those with mobility problems who need a walker (zimmer) or crutches. It is not suitable for the accompanied or unaccompanied in a wheelchair, or an electric scooters for the disabled. In the humidity, heat and risk of sunburn from May to October, it is not recommended that you cycle the Trail unless you are well-used to such strenuous hot and humid conditions and carry plenty of bottled water as no part of The Trail has a water station or stores of any kind. The Trail is ideal for a tranquil walk on a part of it but is not a good place, because of its isolation away from places or people available to help in times of distress, for irregular, strong physical exertion. If you rent a cycle anyway, you will need to cycle back to where you rented it if a rental service will not come to collect you. Ask where you are staying to have this confirmed in advance of your arrival. 

Cruise ship and other visitors should also note carefully that when most Bermudians and residents cycle on the trail with their own cycles, they favor a one-way route (with a friend or relative picking them up) and will generally wait for winter to do this, to avoid the combination of heat and humidity especially in the summer months but also often in spring or summer or fall.

In 2001, the entire Trail was designated a Class B Protected Area under the Bermuda National Parks Act 1986. There are no parking spaces anywhere along it specifically for bicycles to be locked and left. See farms, fields, pastoral tranquility and shining, turquoise open water, depending on where you are. In many areas, the open Trail has trees, plants and flowers hugging the original track area. It is one of the very best ways to appreciate the coastal and inland beauty of Bermuda on foot or by rented pedal cycle. Bring a digital or compact camera to explore and record this unique and  tranquil place for a journey back in time. It was when Bermuda was without any motor transportation (instead of the 2,506 motor vehicles per square mile on the roads now, one of the highest in traffic density anywhere).  A major revamp of the Trail in some places has been accomplished, for example, the stretch from Shelly Bay Beach west to Flatt's. At some point in the future, it is intended that private sector parkland will be linked to the Trail. 

Railway stampBermuda Railway stamp 2

Details and history

Railway in City of Hamilton 1931Train on Front StreetAs early as 1910, a Canadian corporation attempted to bring regularly scheduled, motorized public transportation to Bermuda and went so far as to form the Bermuda Trolley Company Limited. Unfortunately, nothing came from it as there was a bitter altercation between some of its principals and various people in Bermuda that reached its climax in 1924 when an entirely separate entity, the Bermuda Railway Company, was formed. Had the Canadian owned Bermuda Trolley Company not been interfered with, it would have had a positive effect. It would have brought public motorized transportation to Bermuda far earlier than when train services finally began. 

In 1924 a Mr. Cummings arrived in Bermuda, surveyed the land, and announced that a railway was the perfect solution to the island’s transport problems. It was then deemed by many Bermudians and residents as the ideal way to claim to the rest of the world that Bermuda, unlike so many other places on the world's business and tourism map, did not need or want motorcars in the islands and could harness a far more practical alternative. 

It took from 1924 to 1931 to get all eight Acts of Parliament through the local legislature and give the Bermuda Railway Company the authority it needed to buy the land on which to run the railway and start its operations.  

The railway train, engine, other rolling stock such as carriages and track were all built in England by the Drewry Car Company - see  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drewry_Car_Co - which, despite its name, dealth mostly in railway (railroad) matters. The individual most responsible for the successful final establishment of the railway was Harold Jennings Kitchen, a former Drewry design engineer and middle-manager (who stayed until the final end of the Bermuda railway, after which he was appointed by the Bermuda Government to run the public bus company, as the Director of Public Transportation until his death in 1950).

Bermuda Railway 04J. Reginald Conyers was the Vice President of the company. As one of Bermuda's few barristers (lawyers) at the time, he was ultimately responsible for the huge amount of legal conveyancing of property to the company from its original owners. A Member of Parliament in 1928, he was too busy to take on conveyancing load by himself. Thus he recruited Bayard Dill and James Pearman, also lawyers. From that developed the Conyers, Dill & Pearman legal practice still doing business today. All sorts of delays pushed back its completion date. It was an uphill battle, with many approaches to buy land bitterly contested, so much so there was a delicate and expensive business of appropriating—at a price—the necessary property for the tracks. A local jury was appointed to adjust any questions of valuation, which they did to such good purpose for landowners that the company usually preferred to pay the prices asked by landowners rather than send the case up for adjudication.

What was never questioned was the remarkable, quality way the track was laid, over bridges, many areas that had to be made level, deeply indented landscapes and much more. Very grand new rolling-stock had been ordered from England. 

A cutting from the UK's Daily Herald of 1931 mentions a new type of “rail automobile” being made in Preston, intended for the projected Bermuda railway. 

These smokeless petrol-driven passenger coaches modern indeed, before the introduction of Diesels. The first Pullman coaches were painted a delicate primrose yellow with white tops. Excitement at the arrival of the coaches aboard S.S. Bermudian ran high, and a huge crowd gathered along the Hamilton docks to watch their precarious unloading. 

The boat had had a rough crossing and while struggling through a hurricane one unit tore adrift from its moorings and careened about the decks among the other rolling stock, damaging itself and the rest. Repairs had to be done locally. 

Bermuda Railway

But once completed, the trains ran smoothly. It was an expensive and long-drawn out triumph, for when the engineers were not painfully achieving deep cuttings they were raising lofty trestles, to defeat Bermuda’s ups and downs, or throwing bridges and yet more bridges over the many indentations of the jagged coastline.

Bermudians wanted a quick return on their investments. They regarded the project as too risky, especially after the sabotage incidents - and too expensive. They refused to invest (but became builders, train drivers, conductors and users). In 1931, British private investors finally funded its construction. Unusually for that time it was not steam but gasoline (petrol) powered. It was the most costly railway or railroad per mile anywhere in the world.

Bermuda Railway engine 1931The first full successful trial run was made from Hamilton to Somerset (as the line to St. George's had not yet been completed) in the afternoon of Tuesday, 13th October 1931. The official opening was on 31st October. The official party assembled at # 1 Shed in the city where they were welcomed by a reception committee. Governor Cubitt and Lady Cubitt were greeted by Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Jones, for the construction engineers. It was a special moment that day when Miss Rosemary Grissell, step-daughter of the then Governor, Sir Thomas Astley Cubitt and Lady Cubitt started the first train from Hamilton to Somerset. (Another special feature of this grand opening ceremony was the ceremonial cutting, by the Governor, of the ribbon across the new bridge at Somerset, this finally uniting the two islands). Others present included H. W. Watlington, who had guided most of the railway legislation through Parliament; Mr. Stemp, Managing Director and traffic coordinator of the Bermuda Railway Company; and J. R. Conyers, Vice President. Then came Major R. W. Appleby, Attorney General of Bermuda at the time and one of the Railway Commissioners. (Later, he became a founding partner of Appleby Spurling and Kempe, later Appleby Global, one of the two great local legal partnerships).

After speeches, the group boarded the train for Somerset Bridge, driven by W. G. Amos. At Somerset Bridge, more speeches were made. After a buffet reception, the group and driver re-boarded the train. One carriage had to be left behind at Riddell's Bay, after air brake problems were experienced.

Regular passenger service began on 1st November 1931, on the route map shown below. 

Bermuda Railway route

Railway route shown in dotted red line

It was also the day the railway claimed its first casualty. Immediately after his first ride, George Watts Hill Kemp, accompanied by his wife, was able to alight without mishap at a regular stop but in the darkness lost his footing. He fell over an embankment, was severely injured and died soon afterwards. On a happier note, the train tunnel under Bermudiana Road was blasted through to Pitts Bay Road less than two weeks later. When fully completed in early 1932, the line ran from Sandys Parish in the west to St. George's Parish in the east, via the City of Hamilton. (Today, the City, Pembroke and parts of the Devonshire portions no longer exist). Today, the Railway Trail does not pass through any villages or towns. 

Once Bermudians and visitors accepted or were resigned to the system, it gradually earned affection from many. The major reason was its warm reception by tourists entranced by the fun of rides in such a toy, and the unique beauties revealed along its scenically designed track. Many viewpoints were seen for the very first time from the comfort and height of a railway-carriage window. Many Bermudians and residents were taken-aback by what needed to be done to get rid of rubbish seen from the route. 

Bermuda railway 12

The Railway Commissioners were appointed by the Bermuda Government to independently oversee the operations of the railway.  

Almost as soon as the trains started running, spasmodic sabotage complicated matters. It was only by sheer luck and clever judgment of the officials that several nasty accidents were avoided. Fires were mysteriously started along the sheds, obstructions were placed along the tracks. It is thought that some of the damage was engineered by carriage-drivers and owners who saw in the new venture a serious danger to their own livelihood.

Bermuda railway 13

Note the 1st class carriage on the right, at the front of the train

Additionally, the new form of transport caused major problems elsewhere as well. Bermuda was not yet railway-minded. Nor was her livestock. Horses reared and bolted, cows, and goats tethered within sight or sound of the engine ran away and went amok, refused to give milk, and otherwise expressed their disapproval. People living anywhere near the railway complained long and loud about the noise of wheels and whistles. Children rushed from all directions at first sound of any train, and endangered their own lives and the nerves of locomotive drivers by dancing across the lines, crowding too near the carriages, and generally making nuisances of themselves. The local Press published columns of indignant protests and complaints, alongside with passionate vindications from those of the opposite camp. One way and another, the new railway was news. Plus, difficulties natural to Bermuda’s peculiar position and status developed. Ticket-collectors had to cope with mathematical problems in three different currencies—the native pound sterling, American dollars and Canadian dollars. Working out fares from one little station to another meant further headaches, to say nothing of the great issue of Statutory and non Statutory trains. This was an inevitable complication but none the less tiresome for passengers and officials alike. According to its charter, the Bermuda Railway had to justify itself by a steady schedule of so many trains a day. Fares on these trains varied greatly depending on which were Statutory and non-Statutory. This took a lot of explaining to disgruntled tourists who not unnaturally, frequently questioned the demand for a much higher fare on an identical train running on an identical route at different times.

Railway Trail in Hamilton Parish

Part of the railway trail today, just a coastal path where the track once stood

Railway bridge, Crawl

Railway Bridge, Crawl, Hamilton Parish, taken from the coastal path once the route of the railway

The train ran past scenic landscapes and seascapes, via bridges and trestles connecting coves and inlets, many built by Canadian Indians. But they suffered from constant corrosion and many no longer exist. From 1931 it was the only form of public transport for locals and their visitors.

Then came September 1939 and the outbreak of World War 2 in Europe. Bermuda was well away from any land war but the war at sea exacted a grim toll on the railway.

Tourism ceased immediately. Imperial Censorship, British Army and Canadian Army, Royal Navy and Royal Canadian Navy units based here created a new order. From 1941 large portions of Bermuda were long-term-leased US Forces based in Bermuda. They began to use American taxpayers' dollars by the millions, beavering away, assisted by thousands of hard-hatted, hard-drinking, hard-muscled civilian workers, to remove, alter and add to islands to create military bases from scratch. This sudden increase of population reacted immediately upon the railway. Up till then the normal average of passengers a year was about 700,000. In 1942 this jumped, almost overnight, to 1,425,000 and by 1944 exceeded 1,500,000. This was when any thought of obtaining additional rolling stock from England - or anywhere else - was out of the question. The terrific extra load had to be carried by stock already worn in service, and with shortage both of the labor and of spare parts. When the first U.S. troop ships arrived, it was the little railway that transported guns and men to their bases at the new US Naval Operating Base in Southampton and Fort Bell and the US Army and its USAAF at Kindley Field in St. David's.  In all, more than 4,000 troops and their equipment were handled, in that operation alone. It was the railway that had the problem of transporting base-workers living throughout the islands to and fro from their urgent jobs, morning and evening. It took time before essential heavy motor transport for the bases could arrive and be put to use, on roads that had to be reinforced to take them.  Thanks solely to the American military already here, the USA helped enormously to get the railway some relief. General Strong got an AA1 priority for new equipment, including the first Diesel locomotives. One very hush-hush job was the transport in the dead of night by the railway of heavy guns for the fortification of the South shore.  Automobiles on reinforced roads had to be permitted for the American, British and Canadian military. British and American soldiers stationed in Bermuda and their Bermudian counterparts added so significantly to the railway's use with their constant movements that huge damage was caused to bridges, sleepers, track and trestles. Bermuda railway end

But later, the Bermuda Railway became too impractical and expensive. It was unable to meet the costs of repairing its rolling stock. The Bermuda Government purchased the railway company in 1946 at the distressed price of £115,000 pounds sterling (then the island's official currency), primarily to ensure it alone had control over Bermuda's transport system.  

The national bus system was first introduced in 1946, to replace the railway and offer a more comprehensive choice of routes. Three successive Acts of Parliament in 1947 finally officially closed what little was left of the Bermuda Railway. At midnight on 31st December 1947/1948 a small pike of the Hamilton to Somerset part of the track was ceremoniously removed and demolition began the next working day after the New Year Holiday. The last train had gone from Hamilton along the 22 railway bridges between Somerset and St. George's. It was only in 1948 that civilian Bermudians and local residents were allowed to import and own motor cars. It was open for 17 years and carried an estimated 14 million passengers. Its remaining assets were sold at bankruptcy prices by the Bermuda Government  to what was then the British colony of British Guiana (now independent Guyana) in South America and shipped there. (As far as we know, parts of the old Bermuda system still run there, inland).

It may be long gone, but is not forgotten. It was a world record-breaker in several ways - as the shortest time in history (seventeen years) of any railway system; the highest cost per mile of any railway system before or after; with more bridges than any other (one tenth of it's entire track); the largest number of sea-crossings (nine) before or after per entire length of track; the most controversial politically and economically in its history. Never before had any railway cost so much to be completed - over £1 million pounds sterling, for the train to travel three million train miles in its history, estimated with over 14 million passengers - yet resulted in such a paltry sum when sold.

In 1948, the Bermuda Government finally allowed motor vehicles for private use to be imported, so that locals and visitors could go anywhere at any time instead of being bound by the railway and bus timetables. For years, the track deteriorated. The cost of converting the old Bermuda Railway system into a road for motor traffic was deemed to be too high. Finally, in the 1980s, the Bermuda Government converted the abandoned tracks into a walking and biking trail running almost the entire length of Bermuda. Much of it is well away from the continuous noise of traffic on the main roads and a delightful way to see lovely parts of Bermuda that may otherwise be missed. They offer beautiful sightseeing. 

Old railway station Bermuda Railway 5 Railway trail ,Ferry Reach Ruined boat slip on Trail

Railway Trail Photos above by author Keith A. Forbes

Stations of the Bermuda Railway 

Eastern Route

From Hamilton to St. George's - 21 stations

See route of this journey of train, namely City of Hamilton; Pembroke; Devonshire; Smith's; Hamilton Parish; St. George's Parish; Town of St. George.

1. HAMILTON - FRONT STREET
2. QUEEN STREET
3. RICHMOND ROAD (HOTEL BERMUDIANA)
4. SERPENTINE ROAD
5. TENNIS STADIUM
6. RACECOURSE
7. POND HILL
8. PROSPECT
9. DEVONSHIRE
10. STORE HILL
11. FLATTS
12. AQUARIUM
13. SHELLY BAY
14. CRAWL
15. BAILEYS BAY
16. CONEY ISLAND
17. FERRY POINT
18. OIL DOCKS
19. MULLET BAY
20. WELLINGTON
21. ST. GEORGES

Western Route

From Hamilton to Sandys - 23 stations

See route of this journey of train, namely City of Hamilton; Paget; Warwick; Southampton; Sandys.

1. HAMILTON - FRONT STREET
2. MIDDLE ROAD
3. HOSPITAL
4. RURAL HILL
5. ELBOW BEACH
6. ORD ROAD
7. COBBS HILL
8. BELMONT
9. KHYBER PASS
10. RIDDELL'S BAY
11. LIGHTHOUSE
12. BLACK BAY
13. CHURCH ROAD
14. FRANKS BAY
15. EVANS BAY
16. GEORGES BAY
17. WHITE HILL
18. BRIDGE H ILL
19. SOMERSET BRIDGE
20. SOUND VIEW ROAD
21. SCOTT'S HILL ROAD
22. BROOM STREET (no longer exists)
23. SOMERSET

Section 1

Nearly 2 miles long, it stretches east from the Somerset Bus Terminal (original Railway terminal) to Somerset Bridge where Section 2 begins. On October 31, 1931, in Somerset, Governor of Bermuda, Lieutenant General Sir Thomas Astley Cubbitt, formerly opened the western branch - in sections 1 and 2 - of the Bermuda Railway.

Section 2 

Starts between the bridge and Overplus Lane on the water side. Pass Springfield and the Gilbert Nature Reserve, then Harmon's Bay, the Heydon Trust Estate, Scaur Hill fort, Skroggins Bay and former Lantana Colony Club, to Somerset Bridge. Overplus Lane was omitted by mistake when the original survey was made in the 1600's. From the water side of Southampton Parish, see what used to be the US Naval Annex.

Section 3

The greater part is in Southampton Parish. Going east, access it via Overplus Lane. Pass Evans Pond, with native flora including Bermuda cedars. You might see herons. At the junction with Whale Bay Road, there's the former Railway station, now a Sunday School. Diverting along Whale Bay Road for more gorgeous scenery to Whale Bay Park and Beach. Going east back on the Trail, to the left of the main Middle Road, look over Evans Bay and Franks Bay. There, cross the Middle Road and rejoin the Trail for Section 3. From here on, get superb views of the Great Sound and Black Bay. Continue east, via the Tribe Road # 2 junction. See Gibbs Hill Lighthouse. Observe Jews Bay. Note the Southampton Princess Hotel. Below it, on the Great Sound, are the hotel's Waterlot Inn restaurant and Princess Park. Proceed to Riddle's Bay and the Warwick Parish boundary. Take a right on Tribe Road # 7, and go right to the end for the scenery of the South Shore, especially the Beach Parklands area. Parts of Sections 3 and 4 are in Warwick Parish. They start right on the Parish boundary line. Take Middle Road as far as the turn-off to Camp Hill Road at the Heron Bay Plaza (just over the Southampton Parish boundary line). Then turn on Camp Hill Road, then turn left again (going east) at the Bermuda Railroad Trail marker. Note the old Riddell's Bay station. Keep going, to the intersection with Tribe Road # 7. Divert to the right on this road, because it leads to South Shore Park. Stay on the Trail to pass between Warwick Secondary School and Warwick Ridge Park. If trees interest you, look carefully at the variety in the woodland area. Bermuda allspice predominates. Further east, avoid an accidental right turn onto Lusher Hill West. Instead, bear slightly left and you'll walk along the southern perimeter of the Pembroke Hamilton Club (PHC) Stadium where cricket and soccer matches are played. Then walk under the huge old quarry, Khyber Pass. It was named in honor of the exploits in Bermuda from 1851 to 1853 of the Second Battalion, 56th Regiment (West Essex) of the British Army. Its First Battalion was virtually annihilated in 1841 at Khyber Pass in Afghanistan after a disastrous retreat from Kabul. The lone survivor was the surgeon, Doctor Brydon, half dead when he reached Jallabalad with the news. So when the recomposed regiment reached Bermuda, its first overseas posting afterwards, its military reputation ensured that areas of Warwick Parish - Khyber Pass, Khyber Heights Lane, Khyber Heights Road and Khyber Pass Road - and a street in the old town of St. George, near Fort George - got named after Khyber Pass. The Second Battalion also fared badly in Bermuda. In 1853, nearly 230 of its officers and men died in Bermuda from Yellow Fever. A little further, see Warwick Pond on your left, followed by the intersection of Tribe Road No. 3, the end of Section 3.

Section 4

The Paget Parish portion goes past prime agricultural areas. It will take you on both the Trail and Ord Road - named after a former Governor. 

Walk along the southern perimeter of the  Belmont Golf Course. From here, bear to the left, where the Trail continues and discards Ord Road. 

Pass behind Bright Temple AME Church. A little further ahead, you'll see Cobb's Hill Gospel Chapel and Cobb's Hill Road intersection, the eastern boundary of Warwick Parish

A left on Cobb's Hill Road will take you to the intersection with Middle Road, where you can catch the # 8 bus east or west. Two of our favorite places on the Trail are the Paget Parish areas immediately to their east. 

Take a walk to the old Harmony Hall Hotel/Club  (now Police accommodation) in less than one hour - and then from here, to the South Road via an intriguing old tunnel. 

When Paget Parish's exclusive Trimingham Hill area was created and much of Pembroke Parish - from near the City of Hamilton on the south to the North Shore - was re-developed, the Trail lost much ground. 

There is nothing left at all of the original Trail through east Paget and Pembroke Parishes.

Railway Trail, section 4

Key to graphic above right

1. Belmont Golf Course  2. Inland view 3. Old Bermuda houses 4. Tribe Roads 4(a) and 4 (b) to Elbow Beach
5. Surinam Cherry bushes 6. Harmony Club 7. Skyline & St. Paul's Church 8. Railway Tunnel

Section 5  

Railway trail, section 5

Mostly in Devonshire Parish, it begins a hundred yards up Palmetto Road from the junction with the main North Shore Road. See the access sign just east of the Public Transportation Headquarters Building, on the eastern end of Palmetto Park. 

This section heads east to Smith's Parish. 

Cross over the bridge at Barker's Hill, with the Ocean View Golf Course to the south. Pass by Palmetto House. Enjoy the North Shore coastal, domestic homes and rural views. At the Smith's Parish boundary, enter Penhurst Park.

The Smith's Parish portion is only just over a mile long. Going east, there are gorgeous seascapes, from hilly vantage points. The turquoise waters of the North Shore coastline are exquisite. 

The Trail bisects Penhurst Park, with its southern extremity bordering the Middle Road and its northern extremity actually across the North Shore Road and right on the coastline. Further east, you'll cross a bridge going over Store Hill, connecting the Middle Road with the North Shore Road. (Improvements to this area are slated in the near future). At this point, you'll see private dwelling houses to your left and right, in different styles and colors.

As you walk on, overlook two small islands, Gibbet and Little Gibbet Islands. Gibbet Island was where witches were burned at the stake and felons hung in the old days. Cross the North Shore Road to where the remnants of the bridgework overlook Flatts Inlet to see the mouth of Flatts Inlet. This is where the Smith's Parish portion of the trail ends. 

Note the beach on your left. When the trains ran, from 1931 to 1948, they crossed over Flatts Inlet via a trestle bridge and entered Hamilton Parish.

Key to graphic above left

1. Palmetto Park 2. Bridge over Barker's Hill 3. Palmetto House 4. Views of North Channel
5.Rural hillside 6. Penhurst Park 7. Gibbet Island 8. Flatt's Inlet

Section 6

 Bermuda Railway over Bailey's BaySection 6

The Hamilton Parish portion is especially interesting. It starts at the other side of Flatts Inlet, about three hundred yards northeast of the Bermuda Aquarium, Natural History Museum and Zoo. Enjoy a nice view of the Inlet and see the remains of the old bridge pylons where the railway once crossed over.  On the North Shore Road - and Bermuda Railroad Trail - half a mile east of the Bermuda Aquarium, Natural History Museum and Zoo in Hamilton Parish, was once the small, privately owned Bermuda Railway Museum museum.  It occupied a former Bermuda Railroad station. Bus routes 10 and 11 will get you to the nearby stop. Owner Ms. Rosa Hollis had a nice collection of maps, photographs and old Bermuda Railroad memorabilia. They ggve a glimpse into life on the island in the 1930's and 1940's when the Bermuda Railroad operated. A half mile later, just before you get to Shelly Bay, you'll see old chimney ruins (pictured). They were the kiln for intense early to mid 19th century shipbuilding, when Bermuda sailing clippers were in demand globally.  Now completed is a new Shelly Bay Pedestrian link, begun in 1992. It reconnected the long-severed trail from Stonehaven Road to Shelly Bay, at a cost of 418,000. It used a combination of new paths and six new aluminum bridges. The project took 18 months to complete and now walkers can go from Flatts Inlet all the way to Shelly Bay Beach.   There, pass through the Nature Reserve, to Burch's Cove. From there, walk the North Shore Road again, for four hundred yards or so.  Pick up the trail again past the Crawl Hill Esso Service Station, on the sea side. (Improvements in this area are planned in the near future).  From here on, past the Clear View Suites and Villas buildings, the trail has magnificent seascapes all the way. Emerge just before you get to Bailey's Bay.  There are a couple more diversions onto the North Shore Road, then the trail again, along Coney Island Road to near where Hamilton Parish meets Coney Island, in St. George's Parish

Key to graphic above right

1. Coney Island 2. Bailey's Bay 3. Coastline 4. Shelly Bay Park & Nature Reserve
5. Ruins of old chimney used in ship making 6. Flatt's Inlet 7. Bermuda Aquarium  

Section 7

There is a lot more still to see but you have to go to St. George's Parish to see for yourself the magnificent North Shore views. The railway ended, going east, in the (now destroyed) station in the Town of St. George.

Vincent  Astor and his 1938 Bermuda train, Life photoBefore you get there, at Ferry Reach in St. George's Parish is the old Astor estate. It got its name when American tycoon Vincent Astor - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincent_Astor - (1891-1959, son of John Astor who died on the Titanic) built an estate here, on the South Shore of Ferry Reach, at great expense in the 1930's. 

Astor was the major benefactor of the Bermuda Aquarium from 1926 and arranged most of the financing when it was at Agar's Island. His architect was Edward Durrell Stone. The property included a sprawling mansion and guest cottages, all still there, and a large boat house. 

Astor repeated his private railway building at his US estate and built a 2ft gauge (narrow gauge) railway train with 2 small purpose-built carriages, run by a Baldwin locomotive - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baldwin_Locomotive_Works - which also made the carriages - which carried him and his guests over the hill to his own private station on the Bermuda Railway until the railway's death in 1948. The remains of what looks like one carriage and the engine was photographed by this author in 2003 (see photographs below), clearly in an appalling condition, rusted out for decades. Beyond his property, Astor rented use of the railway track from the Bermuda railway operators to run his private guests to other parts of the island on periodic sightseeing trips, at times that did not conflict with those of the railway system. Some effort was begun in 1967 by then-owner Herbert Bierman in hopes of engine and carriage restoration but when he died in 1970 all work stopped and was not later resumed.

Interestingly, at about the same time as the Astor railway was built, there was a similar-gauge small railway in the United Kingdom, the Lynton & Barnstaple Railway (L&BR) - now a Trust in the UK, with a similar or identical Baldwin locomotive, which was scrapped back in 1935. L&BR was restored in 1979 and now runs a steam service. 

When he died, the estate was sold to others.

Old Private railway station at Ferry Reach for the Astor family

Old Private Ferry Reach Station for the Astor family with Astor building nearby

Railway equipment in building next to Astor railway station

Equipment in building next to the Astor Ferry Reach station

Old Baldwin steam engine imported by John Astor

Remains of old Baldwin steam engine

Old Astor railway building

Another view of old building for Astor private railway. Photos by author Keith A. Forbes exclusively for and copyrighted by Bermuda Online.

Today, these rust-ridden relics are the only rolling-stock remnants anywhere in Bermuda of both the original Astor Estate railway and the Bermuda Railway.  It is hoped it is not too late now to have them restored as unique pieces of Bermuda railway history. 

 In 1962, an RB-47 reconnaissance aircraft from the United States Air Force crashed on the property after taking off from the nearby Kindley Air Force Base and damaged some of the outbuildings. All four crew members perished. 

Captured in Art

A prominent contemporary artist has specialized in painting scenes of the Bermuda Railroad. Mr. John Finch is a retired engineer who lives on the Isle of Wight in the United Kingdom but used to come to Bermuda regularly to see his daughter Carolyn, an artist, when she lived here. His artistic renditions of the Bermuda Railway are historically correct and exquisite. One such work, "The Boat Train at Bailey's Bay," features a Bermuda Railroad train crossing the trestle bridge over Bailey's Bay in Hamilton Parish. It is complete with houses of the period near the trestle bridge.

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Last Updated: July 29, 2014.
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