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Bermuda's Warwick Parish

Exploring this county between Southampton and Paget Parishes

Warwick Parish location map

line drawing

By Keith Archibald Forbes (see About Us) at e-mail exclusively for Bermuda Online

To refer to this web file, please use "bermuda-online.org/seewark.htm" as your Subject.

Accommodation

Recommended hotels are shown in bold. Some have the facilities shown by the following symbols. Hotels shown with 5-2 Stars reflect the symbols shown on Expedia.com

Symbols

5 Star - 5 Star hotel 4 Star- 4 Star hotel 3 Star - 3 Star hotel 2 Star - 2 Star hotel

 

Introduction to the Parish

Warwick Parish

Part of Warwick Parish's crest, from that of the 2nd Earl of Warwick

Used with exclusive permission from the copyright owners. Do not copy.

The Bermuda Government appoints a Parish Council for each Parish. It will have more information about the crest and Parish.

About the Parish

Warwick Parish areaWarwick ParishEarl of Warwick

Warwick Parish on Main Island is the same size of 2.3055 square miles as the other eight parishes. It was named after one of Bermuda's Elizabethan patrons, Robert Rich, second Earl of Warwick (1587-1658, see portrait above). A colonial administrator and admiral, he was the eldest son of Robert Rich, earl of Warwick and his wife Penelope Rich and succeeded to the title in 1619. He was the largest original shareholder in Warwick Tribe, later Parish. This association with the central English county and town of Warwick is overlooked by visitors unless they are from Warwickshire in England or Warwick in Rhode Island, USA. It is why the Earls of Warwick were so titled. When young, this Earl of Warwick was decorative. Later, he was heavily involved in colonial ventures early in his career, joining the Bermudas, Guinea, New England and Virginia companies. His enterprises involved him in disputes with the East India Company (1617) and with the Virginia Company, which in 1624 was suppressed through his action. In 1628 he sailed with other privateers and commanded an unsuccessful privateering expedition against the Spaniards. His Puritan connections and sympathies, while gradually estranging him from the court, promoted his association with the New England colonies. In 1628 he indirectly procured the patent for the Massachusetts colony and granted the " Saybrook " patent of Connecticut in 1631. Compelled the same year to resign the presidency of the New England Company, he continued to manage the Bermudas and Providence Companies, the latter of which, founded in 1630, administered Old Providence on the Mosquito coast. Meanwhile in England Warwick opposed the forced loan of 1626, the payment of ship-money and Laud's church policy.

A decade later, the Earl was approached by Samuel Gorton and his followers in an attempt to establish their own colony in lands south of Providence, Rhode Island called Shawomet. Gorton had wanted the Massachusetts Bay Colony to stop its encroachments against him and his followers, and lobbied heavily to the "Governor in Chiefe and Lord High Admiral of the English Plantations in America" for the establishment of a town charter for Shawomet. Rich ruled in Gorton's favor, and, in return, Gorton renamed the town Warwick.

After the accession of King Charles, he became a puritan and joined the Parliamentary opposition. His condemnation of illegal taxation led to his imprisonment. In the Civil War, he was a Captain General of the Parliament's Armies and was responsible for the Royal Navy declaring against the King. A friend of Oliver Cromwell, he died in 1658 mourned by the Lord Protector.

Ann Cavendish, Lady RichIn January 2009 The Royal Gazette reported that portrait of a woman whose father was governor of the Bermudas Company was expected to be sold for as much as $700,000 at auction. Christie's, in New York, included the 17th century portrait of Anne Cavendish, later Lady Rich, in its Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture Auction that take place in Rockefeller Plaza on January 28. 

The painting was done by Anthony Van Dyck, a Flemish Baroque artist and the leading painter of the English courts, most famous for his portraits of King Charles I, and the auction house estimated its value in the range of $500,000 to $700,000.  

His portrait of Anne Cavendish was painted in 1637, during his second stay in England, and just a year before her death and four years before his own. The painting has an illustrious history of ownership, as seen in the details of provenance provided by Christie's, having been owned by among others, Sir Robert Walpole, Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1721 to 1742. Although Anne Cavendish may herself never have visited Bermuda, strong connections to the island can be found in both her family tree and in that of her husband, Robert Lord Rich.  

Anne was born in 1611, daughter of Sir William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Devonshire (1590 to1628), and her grandfather, also Sir William Cavendish, was the 1st Earl of Devonshire one of the grantees of Bermuda and an original member of the "Company of the City of London for the plantation of the Somers Islands".

Devonshire Tribe and Cavendish Fort were named for him and the Earl of Devonshire is said to have owned 245 acres of land in Bermuda by 1663. Her father, the 2nd Earl, continued in the family business and was governor of the Bermudas Company. In 1632, Anne married Robert Lord Rich, the 3rd Earl of Warwick, who also had strong ties to Bermuda. His father, the 2nd Earl of Warwick, was a manager of the Bermudas Company. Warwick Parish was named for him, its crest taken from his own, and it is said that Warwick Academy was built on land donated by the Earl in mid 17th century. 

Anne died in 1638, at the age of 27, mourned in a poem by Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham: "That horrid word, at once, like lightning spread, struck all our ears the Lady Rich is dead! Heart-rending news! And dreadful to those few who her resemble, and her steps pursue."

Because the Earl of Warwick never visited, early settlers had their own pet name for the Tribe. They called it Heron Bay because it then had significance to shipping and many herons congregated there.

Then, settlers didn't swim, so the northern side of the Parish was more important than the south.

Today, there's no area of the Parish with Heron Bay as part of the name. Only in Southampton Parish is there a school and shopping area carrying the name. 

Nowadays, Warwick Parish is famous for its spectacular South Shore beaches. It is also one of the most densely populated of Bermuda's nine parishes. The islands in the Great Sound north of the mainland are shown as islands in Bermuda National Parks below.

Constituencies

Astwood Cove & Park

See under Bermuda Beaches. On the South Shore, at Rocklands Road. A superb beach for the able-bodied but with steep cliffs, sightings of Bermuda's national bird the longtail (frigate bird, pictured) in season - and open spaces. 

Bermuda Longtail (frigate bird)

Picnic tables, parking and toilets are included. The park adjacent to the beach is also a great place to observe the annual great migration of seabirds. Bermuda is in the broad northbound migration route used by many species including terns, jaegers, shear waters and storm petrels. Some come from as afar as the Antarctic. The best months of the year to watch these birds are February through July. Like with all other Warwick beaches, the # 7 bus route stops on the South Road nearby.

Belmont Ferry Dock

Belmont ferry stop

Harbour Road, on the Hamilton to Warwick ferry. It serves residents of the immediate area and visitors staying at hotels nearby not served by buses. It has a gorgeous view of the Great Sound to the west and Hamilton Harbor to the northeast. The nearest island is Hinson's Island.

Bermuda National Parks

Separately named and numbered on a free Bermuda National Parks and Reserves map, available from a Visitor's Service Bureau.

Bermuda Railway Trail

There is a nice Warwick Parish portion.

Burgess Point

Protruding into the Great Sound, this is part of the peninsula that includes the Riddle's Bay Golf course and club. The name derives from when, in 1822, Scottish schoolmaster William Burgess went to live there. A lovely Bermuda private home by this name is on the point, one-acre, listed for sale in 2012 to Bermudians and non-Bermudians at $7 million, with a large dock, beach and pool.

Bus public transportation public buses

Visitors and new residents who use the Bermuda Government pink and blue buses should always first obtain a free copy of the schedule, to know when the service operates, when it stops and what fares apply.

Chaplin Estate

An estate named after Sir Charles Chaplin, Lady Oona Chaplin (daughter of dramatist Eugene O'Neill) -  and their family who once owned the Chaplin Estate in this parish. After Chaplin died, his widow Oona, born in Bermuda (see under Spithead House)  asked for special environmental protection (Zone 34) to protect woodland in return for allowing her to subdivide her estate for homes to be built in the 1990s.

Christ Churchpublic buses

Christchurch, Warwick Christ Church, Warwick 2Christ Church rectory 1947

Middle Road, opposite the Belmont Golf Course. The # 8 bus stops on the Middle Road nearby. Now a Scottish Presbyterian church - Church of Scotland - but built in 1719 as an independent Presbyterian church. It is one of the oldest Presbyterian churches in the Western Hemisphere. On Sundays, morning service is at 8 am and 11 am. A glossy 180 page paperback, available from the church after Sunday service, titled "Presbyterians in Bermuda" covers 1609 to 1984. The pulpit and old churchyard are interesting. It tells of what was Warwick Presbyterian Church before it became Christ Church, written by Joseph H. S. Frith, then an Elder, and edited by the Rev. A. B. Cameron, DD. and published in 1911, in Edinburgh, Scotland, by the Darien Press. From 1745 when the main house there was built, Ministers of Christ Church lived there on Southlands estate. During the late 1700s, when Warwick Academy fell into disrepair, the ministers taught the pupils at Southlands. Christ Church is actually English in its origin - taking its life from those English Puritans who early in the seventeenth century colonized Bermuda. It was built in 1719 on land given by Thomas Gilbert of Warwick Tribe. Additions and alterations have been made, but the original walls remain. Although there is evidence of much earlier association with the Church in Scotland, and preference had always been shown for Scottish ministers, it was not until 1843 that the congregation took steps to become part of the Free Church of Scotland. In 1929 Christ Church, which had been with the United Free Church of Scotland since 1900, became a part of the Church of Scotland, and formalizing its relationship with The Church of Scotland as a full member in 2001. It became a member of the Presbytery of Europe in May 2008.

Cobb's Hill Methodist Church

Cobb's Hill. Phone 236-8586. A stop on the African Diaspora Heritage Trail. Built in the 1800s by free blacks and former slaves.

Ferry public transportation stopsship viewpublic ferries

Visitors and new residents who use the ferry service should always first obtain a free copy of the schedule, to know when the service operates, when it stops and what fares apply.

Golf CoursesGolf courseDiningpublic buses

This web site shows all those in Bermuda. Those actually in this Parish are shown below.

Belmont Golf Course (18 holes)ship view

Belmont Golf

97 Middle Road, WK 09. Telephone (441) 236-6400 or 236-1301 extension 7951. Fax (441) 236-6867. A spectacular 18 hole par 70 course. Facilities include a pro shop, snack bar and restaurant. It quite recently became a slightly over 6,000 yards - more challenging, less hazardous and more attractive course. After draft plans for the revamp by corporate organizations owned by Greg Norman and Jack Nicklaus were both rejected, one by Californian Algie Pulley was accepted. Pulley had earlier carried out improvements at the former Castle Harbour course. This one has greens made faster by Tiff-Eagle sprigs, fairways made more lush by an irrigation system and two man-made lakes separated by a waterfall which help facilitate irrigation. The lakes, in an area between holes 2, 7 and 8, are a centerpiece. They help steer golfers away from residential areas. To reduce the hazards, the current par-3 fourth, where players in the past often sliced right into adjacent houses, was eliminated and the eighth, where balls were often sent into Warwick Villas to the right, also underwent a change of direction. Holes 1 and 2 remain much the same but the third dog-legs up towards a new green just below the existing 4th green. The original 5th hole became the 4th and the original 6th the 5th, with a new green further to the left than before. The original 7th become a new par-five 6th winding its way through the lakes, where the  7th is a new par-3. Rather than a dog-leg, the 8th is short, tight and straight and 9th almost the same but with the green moved slightly to the left with a new clubhouse built to the left. The old 10th became the 15th and 11th is where the 14th was. Both have new greens. The par-5 10th became an even longer 12th, with a new green on the original 11th fairway. The 11th became the 13th, a straight par four over the existing "Ian Crowe" lake. With safety in mind, the old 12th became the 14th, directed away from houses to the right. The 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th remain much as they were, except the 16th has a new green 30 feet to the left to take play away from homes on Belmont Road.

For visitors who arrive on one of the cruise ships, the closest cruise ship berth used to be (until 2007) the City of Hamilton, about 5 miles away to the east, but is now Dockyard, about 8 miles away. If you bring your own clubs, you won't be able to go by public transportation (bus). Instead, take a taxi. Buses go only to nearest stop about a mile away. Check rates directly with course depending on time of day and time of year. Private but will accept off-the-street golfers by prior appointment.  Ask about playability on the day you have in mind.

Riddell's Bay Golf and Country Club (18 holes) ship view

Riddle's Bay Golf Course

26 Riddell's Bay Road, Warwick Parish WK 04.  P. O. Box WK 236, Warwick, WK BX. Phone (441) 238-1060. Fax (441) 238-1203. The club opened in 1922. It was the first 18-hole course in Bermuda, originally over 5549 yards and was designed by Deveraux Emmett (who also designed the Congressional Golf Club near Washington, DC).  When the Duke of Windsor played there in August 1940 during his stopover in Bermuda on his way to the Bahamas as Governor with his American wife, he pulled off a spectacular shot on the home hole. The course is now par 69 over 5,588 yards. Privately owned, an introduction from a member is required for non-members. With a bar and restaurant. On a peninsula, the first hole is the most difficult in Bermuda. It is the only golf club in Bermuda where all the golf carts are electric. They switched in May 2001 but the decision was made in 1997 when the club imported its first electric cart. The new carts are quieter than gas carts, more cost effective and easier to maintain. They are guaranteed to run on a single charge for a minimum of 36 holes for the first three years and have the ability to run for a maximum of 72 holes per charge.

For visitors who arrive on one of the cruise ships, the closest cruise ship berth used to be (until 2007) the City of Hamilton, about 5 miles away to the east, but is now Dockyard, about 8 miles away. If you bring your own clubs, you won't be able to go by public transportation (bus). Instead, take a taxi. Buses go only to nearest stop about a mile away. Check rates directly with course depending on time of day and time of year. Private but will accept off-the-street golfers by prior appointment.  Ask about playability on the day you have in mind.

Grand Atlantic Resort and Residences (proposed)

On a 13.1 acre plot of land south of South Road  bordered on its eastern side by Astwood Walk and the Warwick gas station and stretches westward just beyond the bend in South Road where it junctions with Dunscombe Road.

April 17. The Grand Atlantic housing complex is to be transformed into a condominium hotel complex. Announcing the move at a press conference, Public Works Minister Patricia Gordon-Pamplin said Government had signed a Memorandum of Understanding with a tourism and leisure firm to upgrade and reposition the residential development. The proposed redevelopment of the Grand Atlantic site will create a condo hotel which will make use of existing construction and bring a new all-suite tourism product to Bermuda that is very popular in other jurisdictions, Ms Gordon-Pamplin said. This will be a welcome addition to Bermudas current hotel inventory and a completely unique product for our market. The complex, on South Shore, Warwick, was conceived by the former Government as an affordable housing project. But it was branded a white elephant after just two of 78 units were sold. One of those families has now moved to alternative accommodation, while the second owner is in negotiations with Government to find alternative accommodation. According to Ms Gordon-Pamplin, a condo hotel is defined as a development which is legally a condominium but which is operated as a resort, offering short-term rentals of hotel suites with a front desk and resort leisure facilities. It is anticipated that the units at Grand Atlantic will be sold as a combination of investment and vacation homes, with condo owners being restricted to 90 days annual occupancy per year. When owners are not in residence, they can leverage the marketing and management provided by the hotel operator to rent and manage the condo unit as it would any other hotel room. The 120-day MOU with Caribbean-based MacLellan & Associates has an exclusivity clause which will enable MacLellan & Associates, along with local industry partner Bermudiana Beach Resort, to finance the acquisition and associated development costs of the project. It is anticipated that the site could be prepared for sale of condo hotel units within the year. Currently MacLellan & Associates are working to finalize the financing arrangements for significant design changes, incorporating resort amenities and identifying a hotel operator that is willing to partner with investors in the opportunity presented by this development for a new tourism product in Bermuda. Details of how much Government will be paid for the deal were not revealed yesterday. Ms Gordon-Pamplin said that all financial arrangement will be determined during the 120-day exclusive MOU period. However, the Minister said she was confident that this project will prove to be financially beneficial to Bermuda, adding that, with redevelopment expected to start soon, the deal would provide a welcome boost to the construction sector and also have a positive social impact. Ms Gordon-Pamplin also confirmed that the consultant had been advised of environmental concerns over the complex, which is located close to a cliff face, said by some to be rapidly eroding. Last week Opposition MP Michael Weeks questioned if the OBA was telling potential investors that the property was safe. But yesterday Ms Gordon-Pamplin insisted that the issue was not going to go away. "Once an issue has been addressed and looked at it is there in the public domain. The developer is aware of the publics concerns surrounding the cliff and its structural integrity. They've reviewed the existing engineering documentation, they have physically inspected the site and they will take additional counsel from the structural engineer during this due diligence period."

Earlier. In 2013 there still has been no hotel construction yet although this was first approved in June 2009. The Bermuda Government spent millions of dollars of local taxpayers' money on building/subsidizing supposedly affordable condominiums that except for one unit failed to find a market. 

Grand Atlantic complex

Government's failed Grand Atlantic condominium complex

On June 18 2007, a Special Development Order was granted for a 9-floor 220-suite hotel to be built. A proposed new five-star beach hotel and spa resort was approved as a Special Development Order and if/when when built would rise nine floors  high to offer guests spectacular views across the South Shore. The proposed landmark 220-suite hotel would not stand alone but be accompanied by some five- or six-storey buildings offering luxury fractional and residential apartments and a number of seafront luxury villas. From the 1960s but no longer the plot of land included a derelict former beach bar - the lovely old Bermudiana Hotel Beach Club facility on one of the nicest and least-populated beaches in Bermuda, a once hugely popular restaurant Golden Hind and a number of old buildings. They were all demolished for the project put forward by Atlantic Development. Since then, the Bermuda Government's plans for the hotel and neighborhood changed significantly, several times. Firstly, with the hotel were to be constructed a number of  "affordable homes."  Public money would help finance a 100-room hotel instead of 220 rooms. And as a condition of the capital invested, the developer had to build 125 affordable homes. The deal was touted an example of a public-private partnership during a time of recession. "Affordable homes" came into the picture because it was part of the Government's commitment to the people of Bermuda. The project would use part of Government's Budget for affordable housing as capital for the government-approved developer in an investment partnership. It was the then-Government's way of matching two national priorities, tourism and affordable homes, as a combination of capitalism and socialism. Nothing has happened.

Harbour Roadship view

This is a sightseeing treat loaded with marvelous seascapes. Buses don't service it because it is too narrow and twisting. Don't select the morning and evening rush hours for any moped tour but a time of day when traffic is lighter. Your reward will be views of Darrell's Island with Burt Island behind it, the sweeping panorama of Granaway Deep, the Belmont Ferry stop on the left, also Hinson's Island with Marshall and Watling Island behind it, then Darrell's Wharf on the mainland before Cobb's Hill Road. This marks the boundary on Harbor Road between Warwick Parish and Paget Parish.

Higgs Nature Reserve and Park

Opened in December 2008 by the Bermuda National Trust with a ceremony attended by the Governor Sir Richard Gozney and his wife Lady Gozney. It was left to the Trust by the late Gloria Higgs in 1984, and has since been transformed by the family of the late Sir John 'Jack' Sharpe. The main attraction of the park is Jack's Pond, named for Sir John. Designed by former Government Conservation Officer David Wingate, it preserves a portion of the original peat marsh with a habitat for rare flowers. Members of Sir John's family planted native plants and spreading grass seed resulting in the flourishing reserve seen today.

Islands in the Parishship view

All are in the Great Sound, a body of water north of the mainland of this Parish. These are the most prominent.

Alpha 100 yards southwest of Hawkins Island, Hamilton Harbor.
Beta Great Sound
Bluck's Denslow HouseAlso Denslow's or Dyer's. Great Sound, Warwick Parish. It was referred to as Denslow's as Philadelphia-born American cartoonist and illustrator William Wallace Denslow (1856-1915) - see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wallace_Denslow - who illustrated The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written by L. Frank Baum - once built a turreted castle-like house there in 1903, renamed the island after himself and announced himself thereafter as King Denslow I. He also bought himself a Bermuda sailboat which he named "Wizard" and created a dock for it from the house. From 1903 he did much of his work from his studio at this house. He bought the island from the profits he made from illustrating L. Frank Baum’s classic “The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz” (later shorted to "The Wizard of Oz" book, published in 1900, which became an instant cultural world-wide hit and created first the play and then the movie. The children’s book sold tens of thousands of copies and quickly spawned sequels, a theatrical adaptation and cartoon strips.  Later, he quarreled bitterly with his former collaborator Baum. Denslow and Baum. Both claimed “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” as their own. They almost simultaneously launched competing syndicated newspaper stories that ran in the Sunday comic sections around America and Canada. Denslow designed from his studio in the turret of his Bermuda house his own illustrated cartoons, Denslow’s "Scarecrow and Tinman" which began in December 1904, one of which was known as "Denslow's Scarecrow and Tinman in Bermuda. " The series was short-lived, ended in March 2005. Denslow's sojourn in Bermuda also inspired the setting of a book and play. He worked on them from here. Set in both Bermuda and Vermont and an enchanted underwater fairyland  was his “The Pearl and the Pumpkin” -  a 1904 Halloween-themed children’s book co-written by Paul Clarendon West and illustrated by the artist. Denslow hoped to replicate the popular success of “Wonderful Wizard Of Oz” with a 1905 stage adaptation of the well-received book. One scene had a Bermuda lily field with chorus members dressed as lilies and a scene off North Rock. It received lavish praise from the New York Times. But the play did not find a receptive audience and closed shortly after its Broadway premiere. After the failure of his considerable investment in the musical version of “The Pearl and the Pumpkin”, by 1908 the self-crowned King Denslow I decided to abdicate and abandon his mid-Atlantic realm. On June 8, 1908, in New York, realtor Carl E. Randrup negotiated a sale of Denslow’s Island, with its large stone residence, cottage and other outbuildings. The buyer was a New Yorker, who wanted to make the place his Winter residence. The price was $30,000. Denslow — who was married and divorced three times — began drinking heavily and had difficulty landing secure employment after leaving Bermuda. He moved to Buffalo, New York and found work with the Niagara Lithograph Company designing promotional pamphlets. He eventually drifted to New York City around 1913, finding work at another advertising agency where the one-time lord and monarch of his private island earned just a fraction of his former income.
Burt Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). Also Moses, Murderer's, Skeeter's. 7.75 acres, Granaway Deep, Great Sound. Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Number 14 on Government listing of Bermuda National Parks and Reserves. 
Darrell's Island Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). Not accessible by ferry, owned by the Bermuda Government. See it from western Harbor Road. This 15 acre island in the Great Sound has a unique history. It was once a quarantine station for epidemics in 1699, 1796 and 1799 of small pox, yellow fever and cholera. It was a designated prisoner of war Island Camp during the 1901-1903 Boer War. Its 1,100 involuntary inhabitants  shipped to Bermuda from South Africa to isolate them included Generals of the Boer Army. Many of these prisoners of war died in Bermuda. A memorial to them is on Long Island not far away. In 1936, the island was a purpose built maintenance, refueling station and terminal for flying boats of Pan American and Imperial Airways. The airport here was the base for and pioneered scheduled USA to Bermuda flying routes. It was Bermuda's first permanent facility for any kind of aircraft. On May 25, 1937 the Imperial Airways' Short Empire C class flying boat RMA Cavalier took off from the unofficially opened and not quite finished Darrell's Island Marine Air Terminal in the Great Sound, for New York. At the same time, the Pan American Airways' Sikorsky S-42, code of NC 16735, by then renamed by Mrs. Trippe as Bermuda Clipper, also flew from Port Washington, NY to Bermuda.

Original Pan American World AirwaysCavalier at BermudaCavalier in Bermuda

She did a successful reciprocal survey of the route. On June 12, 1937 the million dollar terminal building at Darrell's Island Airport was formally opened. Bermuda become THE mid Atlantic seaplane and flying boat airport base and resort. It was also the date of the inaugural flights of the Cavalier and Bermuda Clipper. Both landed safely. Both flying boats took off from Port Washington, New York. RMA Cavalier was commanded by Capt. Neville Cumming, with co-pilot First Officer Neil Richardson, radio engineer Patrick Chapman, and steward Robert Spence. Bermuda Clipper was commanded by Capt. R. O. D. Sullivan. Passengers on this particular flight included Mr. John Barritt of John Barritt & Son Mineral Water Company; Major Neville, a staff officer at Admiralty House; Mr. E. P. T. Tucker, General Manager of John S. Darrell & Co.; Mr. E. R. Williams of J. E. Lightbourn & Co. (who later became a Mayor of Hamilton); Mr. H. B. L. Wilkinson, of Bailey's Bay; Miss Minna Smith, a nurse at King Edward VII Memorial Hospital; Mr. Terry Mowbray, Sports Director of the Bermuda Trade Development Board; Mr. & Mrs. Richard Scott of Boston, returning from their honeymoon in Bermuda; and Mr. Eugene Kelly, Mrs. Alice James and Mrs. John Fullarton, all of New York. Later, in support of the two airlines and in anticipation of much more communications traffic, the West India and Panama Telegraph Company Ltd - in conjunction with Britain's Imperial & International Communications - installed an internal teleprinter system between the airlines' offices and the Air to Ground station. Darrell's Island served in a similar capacity for Royal Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force and US Army Air Force flying boats during World War 2. During the war, American use of Bermuda as a military base caused their desertion of this island for the land based airport they built. From June 1954 for several years, the island was used as a film studio location. The old flying boat hanger was demolished in 1974. Then it became a residential island. Most of it later got taken over by the Bermuda Government. Nowadays, part of the island - Darrell's Island West - is the Allen Camp, operated by the African Methodist Episcopal Churches, at telephone 234-0433.

Delta A small island in the Great Sound, north of Burt Island and directly south of Nelly Island, between Gamma and Epsilon. Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat.
Epsilon Very small, south west of Port's.
Eta Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. During the Boer War, prisoners of war on work parties crossed from Port's to Long and the other way around via a wooden footbridge on this island. Privately owned.
Fern Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). Also known as Sin, Hamilton Harbour.
Gamma Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). A mere dot, South of Nelly Island.
Grace Also known as Robbins, 5.9 acres, Great Sound, Warwick Parish. Owned by Bermudian millionaire and philanthropist Mr. Fernance Perry, who has the Grace Island Trust. Birds such as the blue heron make it their home. There was a Christian camping site in facilities finished in 2000, the Word of Life Summer Teen Camp, in part of every August. Contact it at (441) 234-4648.
Hawkins Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). Originally Elizabeth's or Tatem. 5 acres. Great Sound. Re-named after the Royal Navy bought it in 1809. It is not a National Park because it is now privately owned. It's not easily seen in the Great Sound because it is the most easterly of the large group of islands stretching across the center, well hidden behind Darrell's, Burt's, Delta, Gamma, and Beta Islands. It was a Boer War prisoner of war camp from 1901 to 1902. It housed as many as 1,300 prisoners in bell tents. There is no ferry service or public access. But there are privately-run trips.
Iota Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Privately owned.
Kappa Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Privately owned. Now joined to Long Island. Kappa Rock lies between Hawkins and Long Islands.
Lambda Great Sound, north west of Hawkin's and between it and Omega.
Long Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). Once known as Sheep, in that part of the Great Sound known as Paradise Lake. Historically important. Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Once a British Army military burial ground for yellow fever victims it later became a prisoner of war Island Camp during the Boer War in 1901 to 1902. Its 1,100 involuntary inhabitants shipped to Bermuda from South Africa to isolate them from their homeland included Generals of the Boer Army. There's a poignant stone memorial to them this island where 40 died and were buried. 

Long Island cemeteries

Long Island Cemetery 3

Boer War cemetery

An official from the government of South Africa visited here in 1998. Among the distinguished visitors to the Boer Cemetery were former South African Presidents Thabo Mbeki and F.W de Klerk. Mr. Mbeki was in Bermuda for secret talks with South African political opponents in 1989 and had traveled from his exile base in Tanzania. Mr. de Klerk visited in 1997. On May 1, 2000, Dr. Nina de Klerk, sister in law of former South African President F. W. de Klerk, visited the island. Her family was actively involved in the Boer War. Prominent Bermudian businesspeople have private cottages or land on the island.

Marshall's Warwick Parish (Warwick North Central constituency). Privately owned, residential. A large double island, between Hinson's and Long Islands. Its two parts are linked by a narrow isthmus. It was one of the islands purchased in 1809 by the British Admiralty for the Royal Navy. Now owned by Bermuda-based businessman Peter Green.
Nelly Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Great Sound, south of Hawkin's and adjacent to Long. Privately owned.
Ports 20 acres. South of Long Island, Great Sound. Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Privately owned. Historically important. In 1692, after yellow fever first arrived from the Caribbean and killed 800 people - 10 percent of the entire population at that time - this was the first island used to isolate them after their pets were killed. Yellow fever came to the colony many times. A yellow fever cemetery is still here. Prisoners of war were held in isolation here during the War of 1812 to 1814, Boer War of 1901 to 1902 and World War 1.
Pearl Great Sound.
Rickets Between Burt's & Grace Islands, Great Sound.
Theta Not accessible by ferry, only to those with a boat. Privately owned. Between Marshall's and Long Islands in the Great Sound.
Watling One-property residential, near Hinson's and Bluck's in the Great Sound.
Zeta Warwick Parish. (Warwick North Central constituency). 1.5 acres, south of Port's, Great Sound. It is named for the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet.

Jobson's Cove 

 4 star beach Jobson's Cove and Point. South Shore, off South Road. Public. Beach and inlet. An extension of Warwick Long Bay. Named after 17th-century owner, the colonist and planter William Jobson who died in the parish in 1688. The beach and inlet were purchased by him in 1644 from a William Page. Very attractive and secluded. Another great favorite among Bermudians. Great for a picnic, swimming and snorkeling. Rock (cliffs) encircled, thus separated from the sea. Suggestion, take Bus 7 to Warwick Long Bay, adjacent, separated from this beach by a massive area of rock then walk on the trail. Sandy trails cross the dunes and are often used by horse riders. Calm and shallow clear waters for some distance at low tide. No bathrooms (toilets) but available at Warwick Long Bay.

Jobson's Cove

Jobson's Cove. Photo Bermuda Tourism

Khyber Passpublic buses

Kyber Pass here in Bermuda (unlike the main one in Afghanistan, see below) is a large limestone quarry near the local section of the Bermuda Railroad Trail. Once it was a principal site for Bermuda stone for homes and other buildings. Its upper cliff patterns were formed mostly by tools of the hand-held variety. The lower patterns were formed by stone cutting machinery. Most of the older buildings still around today were built with Bermuda limestone cut by a long hand saw pushed and pulled by two people and then carried away by a horse drawn cart from this very quarry. Nowadays, Bermuda limestone blocks are very expensive and are not used much for that reason. Concrete blocks are cheaper. 

Stone cutting Kyber Pass

Stone cutting at Khyber Pass. As portrayed on both a Bermuda Postage stamp and a 1950s postcard.

It got its name from when the Second Battalion, 56th Regiment (West Essex) was based in Bermuda. This is the regiment the First Battalion of which was virtually annihilated in 1841 at the Kyber Pass in Afghanistan after a disastrous retreat from Kabul. The lone survivor was the surgeon, Doctor Brydon, who was half dead when he reached Jallabalad with the news. So when the recomposed regiment reached Bermuda, its first overseas posting afterwards and intended more as a rest cure following action overseas, its military reputation ensured that several areas of Warwick Parish - Kyber Pass itself plus Kyber Heights Lane, Kyber Heights Road and Kyber Pass Road - and a street in the old town of St. George, near Fort George - got named after Kyber Pass. Sadly, the Second Battalion also fared badly in Bermuda. In 1853, nearly 230 of its officers and men died in Bermuda from Yellow Fever.  

Longford Road

Named after the house by that name on the road, which in turn is named after a very pleasant town in the center of Ireland (Republic of). Of interest for both reasons. The road itself connects Middle Road with Harbour Road.

Longford House and Douglas film stars

Owner of Longford House since 2001 is film star Michael Douglas, who was a full-time Bermuda resident from 2002 to his illness in 2009. He is American-born (mother, the former actress Diana Dill Webster (formerly Darrid), is Bermudian). He is a prominent film star, actor and producer, 62 in late September 2006. He won his brace of Oscars for performing in Wall Street and producing 1975's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. His wife is the beautiful and talented actress and prominent film star, Welsh-born Catherine Zeta Jones, 37 in 2006. She was brought up in a small, mostly Catholic, Welsh coastal fishing village and has a Catholic repugnance to divorce. Michael Douglas and his brother Joel in the USA are the sons of Kirk Douglas and the former Diana Dill Webster (formerly Darrid). His grandfather Colonel Thomas Dill was Bermuda's Attorney General. They are the half brothers of Eric and Peter Douglas by Kirk Douglas and his later wife, Anne Buydens. Michael had his first birthday in Bermuda. Eric is an actor and comedian and Joel and Peter are producers. Before his marriage to Catherine, Michael Douglas was married for 18 years to producer Diandra Douglas, with whom he had a son, Cameron Douglas, an actor. He and wife Catherine became engaged in January 2000,  had a son, Dylan, in August, 2000, got married three months later in New York and now also have a daughter, Carys  Zeta, born in April, 2003. Michael Douglas is a founding member of the 20/20 Club (film stars who can command £20 million per movie and 20% of box office and merchandizing takings. The former Diana Dill, now remarried to a former US State Department executive, wrote a most interesting autobiography, including references to Kirk Douglas. (UK's Daily Express, page 40, October 2, 2003). Michael Douglas, despite Bermuda being his main address at the time, was the official "face" for Majorca tourism - a major Bermuda competitor - from 2004 to 2008, in return for the Majorcan government bailing him out of a £3 million investment he made in Majorca's loss-making tourist enterprise, the Costa Nord theatre. He has a holiday home in Majorca.

Michael Douglas has a son, Cameron, by a previous marriage. After his mother and father divorced, Michael Douglas lived for a time on the US East Coast and received an allowance from his mother and step father, William Darrid. Diana Dill Webster's family has lived in Bermuda since the 17th century but her primary home is in California. When in Bermuda, she uses a cottage here at Ariel Sands. The family also owns the Brighton Hill Nursery across the street and up the hill to the right. Another owner was Laurence Dill, who died in late November 2000 at the age of 91. He lived in an historic private home, "Belhaven" in Devonshire, south east of Brighton Hill Nursery. He was an uncle of Michael Douglas. He was a talented local composer and pianist. 

In March 2012 it was revealed that Oscar winners Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones wanted $28K a month rent for their island compound that served as their primary residence from 2002 to 2009. Douglas's mother's family has lived in Bermuda since 1610; paying tribute to that history, he and Zeta-Jones bought Longford House in 2001 for $2.5M, then immediately recruited London-based decorator Stephen Ryan to infuse the space with a feel that combines "quintessentially English" with "quintessentially Bermuda," as a 2002 Architectural Digest story put it. "Naturally we wanted comfort, but Bermuda also has that English formality," Douglas told the magazine. The three-acre property offers a four-bedroom, 7,381-square-foot main house with a "children's suite," as well as a split-level guest cottage, a fruit grove, a tennis court, and a "secret garden with hot tub," according to the listing.

In 2013 it is believed the house has been rented to an international company executive for $28,000 a month. Michael Douglas and and Catherine Zeta-Jones are believed to have split up in 2013.

Middle Roadpublic buses

The Warwick Parish section of this main road, from west to east, starts just east of the junction with Camp Hill Road and the Heron Bay Plaza. It has many interesting attributes, showing off much of typical urban, suburban and rural Bermuda. It's the only complete Parish stretch of any main road in Bermuda that is completely inland, meaning you won't see any views of open water once you start out from the westernmost point near Camp Hill Road. You'll pass Burnt House Hill on your left, St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church on your right, a trio of interesting residential side streets on your left, St. Mary's Parish church on your left, Warwick Pond on your right, the Belmont Golf Course on your left, Christ Church on your right, and more of the Belmont Golf Course on your right. Eventually, you'll pass Warwick Academy on your left and come to Amen Corner (the junction with Cobb's Hill Road). This marks the boundary between Warwick Parish and Paget Parish. The # 8 bus route services the entire Warwick Parish area of Middle Road.

Paradise Lakeship view

It's that body of water surrounded by Long Island, Theta Island, Eta Island, Port's Island, Iota Island, Nelly Island and Kappa Island, in the Great Sound. There is no scheduled ferry trip to Paradise Lake for visitors, to take in the sights and see the historical monument on Long Island dedicated to the Boer War prisoners of war who died in captivity in Bermuda. It is a beautiful but eerie site. However, if you're adventurous and up to renting a motor or sail boat, explore this exceptional marine area. Take a picnic.

Restaurants in the ParishDining

See Bermuda Cuisine

Riddell's Bay

Named after a now-extinct Scottish family headed by William Riddell who owned most of the area in the early 18th century. Also known as Heron Bay. A picturesque, exclusive area now dominated by a private golf course and affluent private homes from the land and their gorgeous coastal scenes, such as shown below.

Riddles Bay

Riddle's Bay

  For golfers (see below), it is exceptional. But others are also urged to visit. The # 8 bus will drop you at nearby Heron Bay Plaza for superb views and seascapes.  Take Riddell's Bay Road. See the golf course on your right.  Go left on Fairways Road for more superb views or continue on to Burgess Point Road. The islands to your right are Darrell's Island, Burt's Island and Rickett's Island.

Riddell's Bay 2

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Churchpublic buses

On Middle Road, the historic Anglican or Episcopalian parish church. The Rector is Father Andrew Doughty, BD, AKC. E-mail adoughty@ibl.bm. The church/ like all other Anglican churches in Bermuda, has its own graveyard.

St. Mary's Anglican Church, Warwick

Spithead Houseship view

Homer's "Inland Water"See the 1901 painting below, "Inland Water, Bermuda" by American artist Winslow Homer. On Harbor Road, overlooking the Great Sound and with British Bermudian architecture, this historic private home is not open to the public. It was built by one of Bermuda's most successful privateers, Hezekiah Frith. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hezekiah_Frith. He hoarded booty from two stolen ships, kidnapped a young French woman, hid her from his wife - and stashed his wealth for his family to start a liquor store. She and Frith are said to haunt the home. 

Frith, with his own maritime and naval background as a privateer sanctioned by Britain's Royal Navy, ensured that Spithead took its name from an area of the Solent and a roadstead off Gilkicker Point in Hampshire, England. It is protected from all winds, except those from the southeast. It receives its name from the Spit, a sandbank stretching south from the Hampshire shore for 5 km (3 miles); and it is 22.5 km (14 miles) long by about 6.5 km (4 miles) in average breadth. The Fleet Review is a British tradition that usually takes place at Spithead, where the monarch reviews the massed Royal Navy. In 1797 there was a mutiny (the Spithead mutiny) in the Royal Navy fleet at anchor.

The hose was a carriage house at the turn of the 20th century. In the 1920s the dramatist Eugene O'Neill (born in USA October 16, 1888, died November 27, 1953) once lived here in alcoholic oblivion with Finn Mac Cool (eventually shot to death by a neighbor). They had earlier lived in Paget Parish. O'Neill and Mac Cool wrote famous works here and hosted many of their friends from overseas. Later, O'Neill met Agnes Boulton, born September 19, 1893, who became his second wife. She was a writer of popular novels and short stories. Their first child, a boy, was Shane, born in Massachusetts in 1919. They divorced not long after the birth of their daughter. Oona O'Neill Chaplin, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oona_O'Neill, was born here on May 13, 1926 - some records claim May 14, 1925. She took the nationality of her two American parents although technically by birth she was a British citizen as well. At some point, after Spithead house was sold by the O'Neill family, it belonged to the Biddle family, believed to have been from who came from Philadelphia. 

In 1941 Oona became one of the most sought-after debutantes of the social season. At that stage in her life she wanted to become an actress and follow in the footsteps of her grandfather James O'Neill, once a noted actor. During her teens Oona attended boarding school in New York where she met Gloria Vanderbilt and Carol Marcus. Later, she became close to Peter Arno (cartoonist), Orson Welles (actor and film director) and J. D. Salinger (novelist). Oona traveled to Hollywood in 1942 where she met silent film legend and British actor Charles Chaplin at the home of her agent. Chaplin began courting Oona after she auditioned for a film he was directing, and the pair married on June 16, 1943. He was 54; she was just 18. The marriage caused her to be disowned by her father. The Chaplin family once owned this house.  With Chaplin she had a good marriage despite the age difference and had a number of children, five daughters (Geraldine Chaplin, born July 31, 1944; Josephine Ronet, born March 28, 1949; Victoria Thieree, born May 19, 1951; Jane, born May 23, 1957; Annette, born December 3, 1959) and three sons (Michael, born March 7, 1946; Eugene, born August 23, 1953; and Christopher, born July 6, 1962). Although Oona was content with her life, she was deeply troubled by the failed relationship with her father. Charlie died in 1977 at the age of 88 when she was only 51. Oona died in Corsier-sur-Vevey, Switzerland, on September 27, 1991 from pancreatic cancer and was buried there. She was said to have developed a few close relationships with Hollywood icons, such as with Ryan O'Neal, but she never married again. 

The O'Neill Society had an International Conference in Bermuda back in about 2000, because of this connection. Files released in 2002 showed the British government blocked a knighthood for Chaplin for nearly 20 years because of American concerns about his politics and private life — he was married four times, twice to 16-year-old girls. He eventually became Sir Charles Chaplin in March 1975, two years before his death at age 88.

From 1956 until 1968, not Spithead House but Spithead Lodge, also on the estate, a smaller property which was once the carriage house of Spithead House, was owned and lived in by British actor, playwright and composer of popular music Sir Noël Peirce Coward (born 16 December 1899, died 26 March 1973). In 1957, from Spithead Lodge he sent a telegram to Agatha Christie, to congratulate her on the recent success of her play ‘The Mousetrap’, which overtook his own play, ‘Blithe Spirit’, as the longest running in the West End. Ms Christie’s grandson, Mathew Prichard, added that his grandmother greatly valued the opinions of her peers. He said: “I’d have thought to have had acknowledgment at The Mousetrap running so long would have pleased her very much.” He also confirmed that Ms Christie greatly admired Mr Coward. Today Ms Christie is the best-selling author of all time, along with William Shakespeare, according to the Guinness Book of Records.

Noel Cowward's September 1957 cable to Agatha ChristieNoel Coward at Spithead House

Photo shows Mr. Coward relaxing on the porch at Spithead Lodge

According to his longtime partner, Graham Payne, Mr Coward did not take well to the island’s winter and summer climate, so both hot and humid in summer and so much cooler in winter than in the Caribbean (but warm compared to East Coast USA) and as a result sold Spithead Lodge in 1959 to Hamilton and Toni Bolton of Montréal. Mr Coward went to live and bought a property in Jamaica that caught the trade winds and kept him cooler. He had originally moved to the island to escape what he considered to be the unjust tax situation in England. Later, the Bolton's, whose family members often came to visit, sold Spithead Lodge for a modest sum.  Another house on the estate is called Watergate.

Until she died in late 2001 at the age of 86, Spithead House was owned by Bermudian realtor Joy Bluck Waters. It was later owned by her children and leased.

Southlands

Southlands Estate 1

Southlands Estate 2

Recent timeline

2013. September 13. Warwick’s Southlands estate is to be turned into a national park and could open to the public as early as next spring. The 37-acre site was the beneficiary of a fundraiser on October 18, 2013 held at the Bermuda National Trust headquarters in Waterville, Paget — the first of several events aimed at covering Southlands’ restoration costs. The site, which is roughly the size of the Botanical Gardens, sparked a furore in 2007 when Government obtained a special development order to build a resort there. Ultimately, developers Craig Christensen, Brian Duperreault and Nelson Hunt agreed to a land swap deal with Government and took 80 acres at Morgan’s Point, Southampton. The conversion of Southlands into a park was discussed by Members of Parliament in the House of Assembly in late 2013. The group Friends of Southlands was formed after concerns expressed by area residents that the site was being neglected. Government reiterated its commitment to turn Southlands into a park in the latest Throne Speech. The first step has been taken in a multi-stage project to restore this beautiful jewel in Bermuda’s landscape. Volunteers came to Southlands on Monday, October 21 through Wednesday, October 23, 2013, to assist the Department of Parks in cleaning up the estate. There was an open house on Saturday, October 26, 2013 with tours conducted by former Government Conservation Officer David Wingate. Workmen had already removed litter and rubble dumped illegally at Southlands — but the site had to be cleared of overgrown vegetation. Environmentalist Stuart Hayward, head of the Bermuda Environmental Sustainability Task Force (BEST) thanked Friends of Southlands for backing the project. “BEST has a special attachment to Southlands,” Mr Hayward said. “It was here that BEST cut its teeth in our role as environmental activists.” Southlands proved controversial for former Premier Ewart Brown when the proposal to develop the site provoked a storm of protest from BEST and others. Environmentalists protested again in 2010 when developers accused Government of delaying the Morgan’s Point land swap deal. There is no exact figure yet for the cost of turning Southlands into a park or for the first round of cleanup and restoration at the site.

2012. June. Because the Bermuda Government finally signed over the former base land at Morgan’s Point to three developers who plan to build a $2 billion luxury resort there, which had been in the pipeline since 2007, the pristine Southlands estate in Warwick is now public property. Bermudian businessmen Craig Christensen, Nelson Hunt and Brian Duperreault, who then owned Southlands, agreed to swap 37 pristine acres at Southlands for 80 acres of brownfield land at Morgan’s Point on the Southampton/Sandys border. Opening up Southlands to the public as a national park will be a very interesting, urgent priority. The name of the park had yet to be decided.

History of the estate

The 37 acre Southlands estate, the largest single estate now remaining in Bermuda, dates back to the eighteenth century.  It is wildly overgrown, historic and environmentally-sensitive with its old limestone-cutting quarries, woodland and  own beach. The main hilltop house, with its three butteries, still standing today, was built in 1745 by the Warwick branch of the Dunscombe family. Later, Edmund Dunscombe and his wife Elizabeth lived there. Their son Samuel was born there in 1770. Edward Dunscombe was listed at living there in 1789. Thomas and (another) Elizabeth Dunscombe who also lived there had a son, Thomas Tatum Dunscombe, born in 1793. The Dunscombe family quarried the limestone-rich land until around 1880. During the late 1700s, when Warwick Academy fell into disrepair, ministers of Christ Church in Warwick taught the pupils at Southlands. The main house has fallen into disrepair but the original limestone and cedar as well as the remnants of the old slave quarters still remain. Today eight properties remain on the estate – but only four are still occupied. Southlands is home to 13 species of tree found nowhere else on the island as well as the biggest Banyan grove in Bermuda — that is remarkably made up of just three trees. Tangerine, mango, paw-paw and black ebony trees grow in this wilderness of exotic plants and trees.  It boasts nine gardens and six ponds — and the coral centre-pieces as well as the stone-walled edges to the ponds still remain intact.   Towards the end of the eighteenth century, Southlands became a limestone quarry. Much of the stone was used to build the City of Hamilton, which became the Island's capital in 1815. During the nineteenth century however, little is known about the estate. It is believed it remained vacant for some years because the quarries made it “undesirable” to prospective purchasers. The next known owner, Canadian businessman James Morgan, a Glaswegian by birth (some say Montreal), and his family, bought the land in 1911. Mr Morgan extended the main house, which looks over South Shore, and added a handful of imaginatively named cottages around the property including The Mistresses’ Cottage and Morning Glory. Morgan (1846-1932) also bought up the adjoining properties, extending the estate to cover more than 80 acres. As the co-owner of Morgan's of Montreal with his brother Henry, he built up a successful business and the Canadian department store was seen as the Harrod's of its day. (It was eventually sold to the Hudson Bay Company in 1960). Under Morgan's artistic eye, Southlands blossomed. In its pomp nine separate properties made up Southlands while more than 70 peacocks roamed the lush estate. Morgan also played a major role in the development of Warwick Academy before he passed away in 1932. His generosity (1918-1928) made possible the extension of buildings around a quadrangle area, which still remains the heart of the school. He also contributed towards an assembly hall (now the gymnasium) and a science laboratory. Morgan was a friend of headmaster Dr. Francis Landy Patton and encouraged students' gardening skills by providing them with plots in which to plant vegetables and flowers. Annual prizes were given to the plots showing the most originality. Morgan also donated a large sum to build Morgan's Hall. The road next to Warwick Academy, Morgan's Road, is named after him. He developed the estate into a wonderland of quarry gardens, exotic plant life, ponds, peacocks, aviaries and horses. Morgan filled in the holes left by the quarrying of the nineteenth century, creating ten ponds and surrounding pathways. He also extended the main house in 1913.  

  The businessman also contributed to Bermuda's heritage by lobbying for legislation for residents to paint their roofs white. He was later offered a knighthood for his civic contributions, which he declined. James Morgan died in 1932 and was buried in the same mausoleum as his late wife, Anna E. Lyman Morgan of Connecticut (1847-1929), on the Southlands estate. The mausoleum, deep in the woodland, is still there now. But the bodies had to be returned to Montreal after thieves repeatedly broke into the tomb in a bid to raid the couple’s possessions that were buried with them.

The next owner of Southlands, from 1947 to 1972, was Brigadier Dunbar Maconochie. He leveled out the beachfront and used it as a training ground for US soldiers, called the Southlands Anti-Aircraft School. The beachfront section of the property was even used by armed forces in the Second World War to practice firing anti-aircraft ammunition into the sea.

In 1977 the Willowbank Foundation then purchased the property. They planned to build a retirement complex but after this failed to materialize, plans were put forward for 130 residential units amid the natural beauty of the grounds. 

After this proposal also failed to come to fruition, the Trustees of the Willowbank Foundation bought the Southlands estate for $1.75 million in 1976 but did not develop it and sold the estate to Southlands Ltd. in December 2005. Southlands Ltd.'s four key figures are businessmen Craig Christensen (whose daughter has lived on the property since 1995), Nelson Hunt, Brian Duperreault and wife Nancy. Until March 2008 it was planning a Jumeirah Southlands five-star resort. The Special Development Order (SDO) granted bypassed all the environmental impact controls. The SDO was approved by Cabinet and rubber-stamped by Environment Minister Neletha Butterfield after the original Planning application was rejected by Planning officials. Later, it was agreed by the Bermuda Government that the Southlands property would not become a hotel, would remain a park and would be exchanged for the former US Navy base in Southampton.

South Roadpublic buses

It was first built by the British Army in the 1850s in its massive development of Bermuda before tourism became famous. You begin this scenic spectacle just a little west of Warwick Camp, the home of the Bermuda Regiment today. You'll have gorgeous views of the South Shore's Chaplin Bay, Stonehole Bay, Jobson's Cove, Warwick Long Bay (all part of the South Shore Park) and more. Special off road vantage points overlook the South Shore to park a rented moped and soak in the seascapes below, without impeding traffic. The road occasionally dips inland but you'll find even more to see as you continue as far as the junction with Cobb's Hill Road. This marks the boundary between Warwick Parish and Paget Parish. The # 7 bus route services the Warwick Parish stretch of the South Road.

South Shore Parkpublic buses

Has some of Bermuda's choicest beaches. This is the entire stretch of the South Shore beaches, park and trails area stretching from Horseshoe Bay in Southampton Parish and going east. The prime Warwick Parish section of it begins at Chaplin Bay. It traverses Stonehole Bay and Jobson's Cove, and ends at Warwick Long Bay. Chaplin Bay is a superb public beach and scenic attraction, equal to the more famous Horseshoe Bay (in Southampton Parish), but without catering and changing facilities. If you're looking for a terrific beach with pink sand, turquoise waters, limestone cliffs and trails and more, in a nice location, this is a prime spot. Jobson's Cove is a small but gorgeous sandy beach cove is just east of Stonehole Bay. It too is a superb public scenic attraction, a terrific beach with pink sand, turquoise waters, limestone cliffs and trails and more in a nice location. Stonehole Bay. This small cove is between Jobson's Cove and Chaplin Bay. It is a superb public beach and scenic attraction, yet another prime location.

Stonehole Bay

 4 star beach Stonehole Bay. South Shore, off South Road. Public. It is located between Chaplin Bay and Jobson's Cove, at the extreme western end of this parish. Small, but gorgeous at low tide, hardly visible at high tide so be prepared to visit only at low tide. You will then be rewarded by this lovely setting with fewer visitors. It is one of the prettiest of all Bermuda's South Shore coves. Be aware of rip tides and cloudy waters near the coral reefs that can make good snorkeling uncertain. A personal favorite. There's an unusual history of this serene site. First, with the unusual name. It is so-called because of a gaping hole in a cliff-top coral formation that gives the stunning natural stone frame view of the beach. Not surprisingly, given that directly north of it on the land side of the South Road is the former British Army's Warwick Camp (later taken over by the Bermuda Regiment), for many years it was a favorite haunt of British Army regiments once quartered there in whole or in part. And because of this, they originally devised what later became known as Stonehole Stew, in commemoration of the beach. This unique stew was a culinary mix of initially British Army later civilian locally grown pumpkins, white or red and sweet potatoes, onions and salted imported beef traditionally cooked on camp fires in a three-legged iron pot.

Stonehole Bay

Photo: Bermuda Tourism

Supermarkets public busesShopping

Be prepared and budget in advance for Bermuda prices. Food shopping is expensive.

Fresh fruit

Tivoli House and Tivoli North Nature Reserve

Tivoli historic house

Middle Road. The Tivoli estate is 11.26 acres. Donated to the Bermuda National Trust in 1984 by Gloria Higgs, to preserve as open space. Also includes Tivoli Pond and the Tivoli historic house shown in the attached photo. Thanks to a donation by the family of the late Sir John Sharpe, a former Premier of Bermuda, the pond is being conserved as a remnant of marches that once extended through Warwick Valley. It will be a refuge for wildlife and protected green space in a busy suburban area and a learning resource for schools. Once, many years ago, Bermudians and residents had a vegetable garden out back that they used to sustain the household. Nowadays, many barely have space for a potted plant, let alone an entire garden. The Bermuda National Trust offers community garden allotments here at Tivoli. The Ross Blackie Talbot Foundation raised $30,000 for the project in its final fundraising year. The money goes towards the ongoing maintenance of the property. A number of volunteer groups also helped by creating and clearing the space, turned into approximately 20 allotments of 20ft X 10ft. The plots cost $130 a year, some of which goes to a BNT membership. The only caveat is that anything planted has to be organic. There is also an orchard on the site producing a variety of fruit bearing plants including figs, guava and avocados.

Tribe Road No. 7

This is a most interesting and scenic hike for more adventurous visitors with a special liking for uphill and down dale walking and the stamina to go with it. It offers spectacular views of all kinds. It connects the Middle Road with the South Road. En route, it gives you access to the Bermuda Railroad Trail and Spice Hill Road, both of which offer much in superb sightseeing of rural places and woodlands, of the type most tourists never get to see. At the South Road end, it offers a spectacular panoramic view of the gorgeous beaches and park lands of South Shore Park. The # 8 bus will drop you off near the Middle Road entrance to this road and the # 7 bus will do the same for the South Road access.

Warwick Camppublic buses

South Road, facing the ocean, this military facility has long been one of the principal homes of the British Army Regiments and battalions once based in Bermuda, soldiers from which one dug much of the South Road for military protection purposes. It is now the home of the Bermuda Regiment, a sightseeing attraction for anyone with an interest in military history and big guns. The two six inch cannons that repose here were the last British guns to be built in Bermuda by British Army craftsmen in 1939. They and their gunners guarded the South Shore from this site during World War II.

Bermuda Regiment HQ

Warwick Camp Bermuda Regiment

Bermuda Regiment being inspected by the Governor

Bermuda Regiment on parade

Bermuda Regiment Band members

Warwick Long Baypublic buses

Warwick Long Bay

Photo: Bermuda Tourism

Bermuda's longest stretch of prime beach, particularly favored by many Bermudians and visitors. Part of the South Shore Park.  It is absolutely gorgeous for swimmers and an outstanding scenic attraction. Cliff trails can be explored. It's a great place for a picnic. Public conveniences (toilets) are nearby. A playground for children is included. Access all these beaches from the South Road, or overland from the Middle Road. Views and opportunities for photographs, picnics and more are great. The remains of a 17th century fort were found here in 2003. The # 7 bus route runs here. Residents of the area feel that Warwick Long Bay is one of the last unspoilt beaches, a quiet and family area, where people come knowing their children will be safe. To them  it's an unsuitable site for a commercial development, just from the point of view of the natural beauty of the area. It's a place people can go to relax without music, noise or people drinking.  

Warwick Parish Council

Appointed under the Parish Councils Act 1971. See under "Parish Councils" in Bermuda Government Boards.

Warwick Pond Nature Reservepublic buses

Has an inland pond, the second-largest freshwater pond in Bermuda, located just to the north of the mid-section of the Warwick Parish section (part of section 3) of the Bermuda Railway Trail. It's an important sanctuary for resident and migratory birds, accessible from its northern side on the Middle Road. The # 8 bus route will take you to the Middle Road access. In 2000, the Bermuda National Trust enlarged the parking area, improved the trail, enhanced forest management and created a lookout deck over the pond. The new trail links to the Bermuda Railway Trail, provides a better route for walkers and has a handrail in places. See interpretive signage about migratory waterfowl and creatures in permanent residence. Students can use the pond as an outdoor classroom to learn more about Bermuda's natural environment, via Bermuda Union of Teachers workshops.

Warwick Ridgepublic buses

On the southern side of the Bermuda Railway Trail, at the point where Warwick Secondary School is on the northern side. The woodland around here is mostly fragrant Bermuda indigenous allspice. 

WindReach

Spice Hill Road. A facility for the disabled, a registered charity with an Adaptive Sports Program, which allows people of similar abilities to engage in enjoyable and competitive activities specifically including horse riding. The program is one of several WindReach operates to improve the quality of life for those with special needs. It gives participants a positive influence on their overall health, quality of life, self-confidence, general level of activity, feelings of empowerment and general satisfaction with life. It helps prevent a decline in physical, cognitive, psychosocial functioning and to relieve stress and reduce depression. There is also a WindReach Slammers basketball team. WindReach continues to increase awareness and participation in adaptive sports in Bermuda, forming partnerships with other local agencies.

Other Bermuda geographic areas

City of Hamilton Hamilton Parish Paget Parish Pembroke Parish Sandys Parish
Smith's Parish Southampton Parish St. George's Parish Town of St. George Warwick Parish

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Last Updated: September 20, 2014.
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