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Bermuda's Paget Parish

Exploring this central county bordering Devonshire, Pembroke and Warwick

line drawing

By Keith Archibald Forbes (see About Us) at e-mail exclusively for Bermuda Online

To refer by e-mail to this file use "bermuda-online.org/seepaget.htm" as your Subject

Recommended hotels are shown in bold. Some have the facilities shown by the following symbols. Hotels shown with 5-2 Stars reflect the symbols shown on Expedia.com.

Accommodation

Introduction

Paget Parish

Part of Paget Parish's crest, identical to that of the fourth Lord Paget mentioned below

Used with exclusive permission from the copyright owners. Do not copy.

The Bermuda Government appoints a Parish Council for each Parish. It will have more information about the crest and Parish beyond that shown below. 

Paget Parish areaPaget ParishPaget Parish is on Main Island, the same size as the other eight parishes. It is on Bermuda's South, Middle and Harbour Roads. It was named in 1617 after Elizabethan patron, English peer and colonist William Paget, fourth Lord Paget (1572-29 August 1629), 4th Baron Paget de Beaudesert. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Paget,_4th_Baron_Paget_de_Beaudesert

Born in Beaudesert, Warwickshire, England the year of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew, he was the son of Thomas Paget, 3rd Baron Paget and Nazareth Newton. On 27 February 1586/87 after his grandmother's death, the Queen made him a ward of Sir George Carey. He matriculated at Christ Church College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 31 July 1587. He graduated from Christ Church College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, on 25 February 1589/90 with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.).

He spent much of his life under suspicion in England because of his father's ardent Roman Catholicism. His father fled to Spain and was considered a traitor. His son turned Protestant and grew to hate all things Spanish but was still mistrusted by Queen Elizabeth, even after serving with Lord Essex in the Calais Expedition of 1596. He avoided the same fate as Essex. He was finally restored to his paternal lands and honors by King James in 1605. He was admitted to Middle Temple on 20 February 1610/11 entitled to practice as a Barrister-at-Law. 

In 1612 he became a member of the Virginia Company which then included Bermuda. He was one of the illustrious band of gentlemen "Adventurers" who invested in the Bermuda Company to colonize the Bermuda islands from 1615 onwards. He was the largest shareholder in the original Paget Tribe named after him in 1617, later Paget Parish. He is buried at West Drayton in Middlesex, England.

Children by him and Lettice Knollys were the Hon. Katherine Paget; Hon Margaret Paget and Sir William Paget, 5th Lord Paget, born September 1609, died 19 October 1678.

Early settlers called the Tribe Crow Lane. Crows were there and "lane" meant a "sheltered waterway." Today, Crow Lane is the easternmost area of Hamilton Harbor, a busy "roundabout"  (rotary) and small park. 

This Parish is not as far from the Bermuda International Airport as western Parishes. Its northern side is served by Bermuda Government ferry boats. Its middle and southern areas have buses.

Parish Bermuda political constituencies

Hungry Bay shown at bottom

Hungry Bay (see later on this page), in the No 12 Devonshire South Constituency, is the bay shown in red at the bottom of the map above.

Avocado Lodge Parkwalking area

A Bermuda National Park. A small but interesting facility off Middle Road a little west of the US Consul General's Office and partly down Corkscrew Hill.

Alfred Blackburn Smith Nature Reserve

8.7 acres, it is not public but open to guests and members of the Coral Beach Club and Bermuda Audubon Society. It was donated in 2003 by then owner Elfrida Chappell, daughter of the late Mr. Smith, to the Bermuda Audubon Society and named as such after him. He gave it to his daughter as a 21st birthday present in 1935. It is one of the last undeveloped tracts of undeveloped Bermuda upland forest. It offers spectacular views of the South Shore.

Bermuda Gardensdisabledwalking area

A few - not all - are accessible to the disabled in a wheelchair.

Bermuda Collegepublic buses

Bermuda College 2Bermuda College

Off South Road. See Education in Bermuda. It is NOT a university as it does not award degrees. It owns - but no longer operates (it leases) the Coco Reef Hotel (formerly Stonington Beach Hotel). It has some some fine academic buildings. It is a technical institute, community college, hospitality training center, business school and further education center for adults. It also has a library, open to the public, on a membership fee basis. Bermuda Government owned and operated as a guango, it is the equivalent of a junior college in the USA or a community college in the UK. 

 Bermuda College map

Bermuda National Trust headquarters at Watervillepublic buseswalking area

Bermuda National TrustNational Trust properties throughout Bermuda are open to visitors - for a fee for those who are not members in Bermuda or places abroad that reciprocate the membership, or free for members. Americans who are current members of The Royal Oak Foundation should ask if they are entitled to free admission to all properties open to the public, because they are if they visit the United Kingdom. 

Members of National Trusts in Australia, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Jersey (UK Channel Islands), Fiji, Japan, Isle of Man, New Zealand, Puerto Rico, Scotland and Zimbabwe are admitted free if they remember to bring current their membership cards with them to Bermuda. 

Bermuda based members of the Bermuda National Trust can visit National Trust premises in the same countries for free when visiting there, if they take their Bermuda membership cards with them.

This organization owns several museums and more other private properties than any other organization in Bermuda, many of which it rents out to overseas people. Its historic headquarters of "Waterville" shown here has small but nice gardens including roses. 

Waterville Park, also part of the property, is on the shore. The grounds but not the house are open to the public. They are adjacent to and join Crow Lane Park.

Description of each property

All are historic buildings or areas. HM is an historic monument.

Bel Air. Cobb's Hill Road, Paget.
Bridge House. Off King's Square, Town of St. George. Art gallery and gift shop.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Shell House of Keep Yard at Royal Naval Dockyard in Sandys Parish.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Shifting House of Keep Yard of above.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Main Magazine, Sea Service of above.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Second Magazine & Shell House, Keep Yard of above
Bermuda Maritime Museum Eastern Store House, Keep Yard of above.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Former Commissioner's House of above.
Bermuda Maritime Museum Boat Store of above.
Buckingham. King Street, Town of St. George.
Casino. Water Street, Town of St. George.
Cluster Cottage. St. Mary's Road, Warwick.
Fanny Fox's Cottage. Governor's Alley. Town of St. George.
Globe Hotel. (Confederate Museum). York Street, Town of St. George.  Now a museum. Telephone 441 297 1423. Open Monday to Saturday 10 am to 4 pm, Sunday 1 pm to 4 pm.
Old Rectory. Broad Alley, Town of St. George. Open Wednesdays from November to March, 12 pm to 5 pm.
Paget Marsh. Middle Road, Lover's Lane, Paget. Telephone 441 236 6483 for further information.
Palmetto House. North Shore Road, Devonshire, telephone 441 295 9941. Open Thursday, 10 am to 5 pm.
Pembroke Hall and Boathouse. Pembroke, Crow Lane.
Royal Navy Cemetery. Ireland Island, Sandys Parish.
Royal Navy Dockyard defence works on Ireland Island North, Sandys.
School Lands Cottages. Pembroke. Including outbuildings.
Reeve Court. King Street, Town of St. George.
Samaritan's Lodge & Cottages. Bermuda Lodge Heritage Museum, Water Street, Town of St. George. Telephone 441 292 6157.
Spittal Pond. South Road, Smith's. Open daily. Keep to the pathways provided.
Springfield and Gilbert Nature Reserve. Somerset Road. Sandys.
Stewart Hall. Queen Street, Town of St. George.
Tivoli. Middle Road, Warwick.
Tivoli South. Stadium Lane, Warwick.
Tucker House. Water Street, Town of St. George. Open Monday to Saturday, 10 am to 4 pm Telephone 441 297 0545
Unfinished Church. Government Hill Road, Town of St. George.
Verdmont & Cottage. Verdmont Lane, Smith's. Telephone 441 236 7369. Open Tuesday to Saturday 10 am to 4 pm.
Waterville. (See photograph above). Corner of The Lane and Pomander Road, Paget. Office open Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm. Telephone 441 236 6483.

Bermuda Railway Trailpublic buseswalking area

Birdsey Studio

5 Stowe Hill, Paget PG 05. Telephone (441) 236-6658 or 236-5845 or fax (441) 236-9123. Artist and sculptor Joe Birdsey Linberg is the daughter of the late renowned artist Alfred Birdsey (1912 to 1996). She is married to Norwegian architect Sjur Linberg. A nice attraction if you like Bermuda art. Numerous tourists stop here to admire the art and tranquil garden setting of interesting plants.

Bus routespublic buses

Visitors and new residents who use the Bermuda Government pink and blue buses should always first obtain a free copy of the schedule, to know when the service operates, when it stops and what fares apply.

Camdenpublic buseswalking area

See in Bermuda Botanical Gardens

Coco Reef Bermuda 4-starDiningMeeting RoomPoolTennispublic bus

Coco Reef beach and hotel

3 Stonington Circle, South Road, Paget Parish, Bermuda PG 04. Phone (441) 236-5416. Fax (441) 236-9766. Formerly Stonington Beach Hotel. 32 ocean view rooms and 2 one-bedroom ocean-front suites. The real estate is owned by the Bermuda Government and is leased to the current operator. It first opened in 1980 as a training ground for students at the Bermuda College (a junior college, awarding associate degrees). Name changed June 2003 to reflect the Coco Beach name of its Tobago-based Bermudian property owner and land leaseholder John Jefferis who once managed the nearby Elbow Beach Hotel. Overlooking the ocean and with a shared  - by Elbow Beach - gorgeous private beach (until the late 1950s it used to be public Elba Beach (named after the island where Napoleon was first exiled and escaped from until the original Stonington Beach hotel was built), complete with superb boiler reefs, one of the very best of all Bermuda beaches. Less than a ten minute drive from the City of Hamilton and on the # 2 and # 7 bus routes. With tennis courts, bar, two restaurants and a fresh water pool. In January 2008 a Bermuda Government-issued Special Development Order was granted in lieu of normal planning regulations, for an additional  66 luxury holiday apartments. The latter are for sale to non-Bermudian as well as Bermudian buyers and can be leased back to the hotel for transient visitors for six months of the year by mutual agreement in accordance with local legislation. In May 2010 the Bermuda Government pledged to ensure publicly paid consultants will stay at the Coco Reef Resort while visiting Bermuda on official business. 

Coral Beach Tennis Club & Cottages 4-starDiningMeeting RoomPoolTennispublic bus

Coral Beach ClubDiningMeeting RoomTennisGolfpublic bus 66 rooms. South Road, Paget Parish. Air-mail postal address is Horizons Ltd, P. O. Box PG 200, Paget, PG BX, Bermuda. Telephone: (441) 236-2233. Fax: (441) 236-1876. Just west of the Elbow Beach Hotel, it is less than 3 miles from the City of Hamilton. A Private Club. If not a member, you need an introduction from one.  Garden and estate cottages are spread over a large, groomed estate with its own gorgeous private beach.  International tennis is often played here. There are 8 clay courses, 3 lit. With Horizons & Cottages - because it has the same owner - it shares a 9-hole mashie golf course. On bus route # 7. 

Guests at the property who stay here should see the Alfred Blackburn Smith Nature Reserve. 8.7 acres, it is not public but open to guests and members of the Coral Beach Club and Bermuda Audubon Society. It was donated in 2003 by then owner Elfrida Chappell, daughter of the late Mr. Smith, to the Bermuda Audubon Society and named as such after him. He gave it to his daughter as a 21st birthday present in 1935. It is one of the last undeveloped tracts of undeveloped Bermuda upland forest. It offers spectacular views of the South Shore.

In April 2009 Plans for a Four Seasons Hotel 150-room five-star hotel and fractional resort here were scuttled by planning officials. The Development Applications Board (DAB) refused the 'in principle' planning application for the Four Seasons Hotel, citing several examples of how the development would defy the zoning of Draft Bermuda Plan 2008. Developers Brickman Holdings of New York, which bought the property in January 2008, submitted the application, with the resort to be managed by Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. More than 40 objections were received against the five-star hotel and residence club. The Bermuda National Trust, Bermuda Environmental and Sustainability Taskforce (BEST) and scores of residents raised concerns about loss of open space, potential traffic congestion and construction noise. The plans for the resort included 60 fractional ownership 'cottage colony' style villas at Horizons and Coral Beach. Another 20 residential units were to be built for sale to sole owners. The 150-room hotel was to be accompanied by a spa, fitness centre, tennis courts, pools and a conference centre. The Horizons nine-hole golf course was to disappear and the resort would also have brought major changes to South Road, with new access points and a pedestrian underpass tunnel near the entrance to Coral Beach. If approved, South Road would also have undergone a reconfiguration, to straighten a bend at "two well-known traffic accident spots". An access road would have also linked the resort to Tribe Road Five. This drew 25 letters of objection from residents, who claimed traffic congestion along Ord Road, Southcote Road and the tribe roads would increase as a result.

Planning officials initially refused the application for reasons including:

On appeal, a modified plan was approved in June 2009 to develop a 150-room hotel and 80 fractional units. Instead of closing in 2009 as hoped to make way for redevelopment the property remained open for business. In March 2010, Four Seasons Resort and Hotel gave its name publicly to the redevelopment of Coral Beach Club for the first time. A joint statement from Brickman, which own the Coral Beach Club and Horizon Cottages properties, and Four Seasons said construction on the initial phase was expected to begin in 2010. It has been delayed.

Crow Lanepublic buseswalking area

A Bermuda National Park near a busy highway a mile east and south of the City of Hamilton.  It overlooks and fronts Hamilton Harbor. Its name comes from when the whole area was populated by crows. Sit on a bench or under a tree, see the views of the harbor and city.

Crow Lane ParkJohnny Barnes

Left: Crow Lane Park facing the City of Hamilton (photo Keith A. Forbes). Right: Johnny Barnes (photo Government Information Services)

Today, the park is peaceful, but on June 2, 1730 it was used to tar and burn at the stake Sally Basset, a black slave, convicted of poisoning slave owners Sarah and Thomas Foster or, as some other accounts say, Francis Dickinson of Southampton Parish.  She maintained her innocence but her stand against slavery was well known. Complicating the case was that by 1729 she was considered old and was  placed on the auction block. It is alleged she instructed her granddaughter Becky in the use of poisons, to poison her owners. She was regarded by whites of the day as a ringleader of poisoning plots.  Thus this is a stop on the African Diaspora Heritage Trail. 

It is from the roundabout (rotary in the USA) near this park that Johnny Barnes, a remarkable Bermudian senior citizen, has made it a tradition for decades of waving a cheery "Good morning" - in all weather - to commuters exiting the parish to enter Pembroke Parish to work in or near the City of Hamilton. Near the entrance to the Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute is a statue in his honor.  It was funded by Andrew Banks, a philanthropist actively involved with the Jewish community, an American producer, who has been recognized publicly for donations to the Bermuda Underwater Exploration Institute.

Darrell's Wharf

Harbour Road, between Morgan Road and Cobb's Hill Road, Paget. A ferry dock and stop for residents and visitors, on the ferry route. It serves residents of the immediate area and visitors staying nearby who are not served by buses. It is also a beauty spot well worth a brief visit for photographs. It has a gorgeous view of the Great Sound and Hamilton Harbor to the northeast. Cars parked on the wharf belong to Hinson's Island residents who can't transport them to the island so they hop the ferry to Darrell's Wharf every workday morning, take their cars into the city of Hamilton - and reverse the procedure every evening. The # 8 bus route stops on the Middle Road at the junction with and half way up Cobb's Hill Road nearby.

Elbow Beach4-starDiningMeeting RoomPoolTennispublic bus

5 star beach Private part, includes the lovely Elbow Beach Hotel. So-called as the beach has a gentle curve similar to a human elbow. Beach-front of up-market Elbow Beach Resort Hotel, one of the most expensive and luxurious places to stay in Bermuda. With luxurious facilities such as restaurants, bars and much more plus a concession with snorkel equipment, kayaks, sand chairs, beach umbrellas and more. There is a shipwreck about 100 yards offshore. Also with lovely gardens on the land side of the beach.

Elbow Beach, private

Elbow Beach, hotel part, Bermuda Tourism photo

 4 star beach Public part. Off Tribe Road + 4, off South Road. Walk 500 yards or so or park. One of the closest public beaches to the City of Hamilton 2 miles away and its mid-size cruise ship visitors in port there from April through October. This section of the three-section beach is adjacent to and between the up-market Elbow Beach Resort Hotel and the exclusive Coral Beach Club. Basic bathrooms (toilets). In season, a lunch wagon provides fast food. Bus routes 2 or 7. (There is a bus stop nearby, on the South Road). 

Elbow Beach public part

Elbow Beach public part, photo Bermuda Tourism

Ferry stops for residents and visitorspublic ferries

They can obtain a free copy of the schedule, to know when the service operates, when it stops and what fares apply.

Darrell's Wharf. Harbour Road, between Morgan Road and Cobb's Hill Road, Paget. On the Hamilton to Paget round trip ferry route.

Hodson's Ferry Dock. Harbour Road and Chapel Road, Paget, on the Hamilton to Paget round trip ferry route. It serves residents of the immediate area and visitors staying at the Newstead hotel nearby who are not served by buses. It is also a beauty spot well worth a brief visit for photographs. It has a gorgeous view of the Great Sound and Hamilton Harbor to the northeast. The island opposite is White's Island, owned by the City of Hamilton and a recreational site, with a favored anchorage for motor yachts just off it.

Lower Ferry Dock. Harbour Road, on the Hamilton to Paget round trip ferry route. It serves residents of the immediate area and visitors staying at hotels nearby who are not served by buses. It is also a beauty spot well worth a brief visit for photographs. It has a gorgeous view of the Great Sound to the west and Hamilton Harbor to the northeast.

Salt Kettle Ferry dock. Off Harbour Road and end of Salt Kettle Road, on the Hamilton to Paget round trip ferry route. It serves residents and visitors staying at guest houses or apartments in the area. It's also a beauty spot worth visiting with gorgeous view of the Great Sound and Hamilton Harbor. The great American artist Winslow Homer painted several scenes here. Most people today have no idea Bermuda both inspired and featured in them. Homer painted at least 21 watercolors of Bermudian landscapes and seascapes. These were received with so much acclaim in 1901 when exhibited at the Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, that Homer was awarded a gold medal for them. Several are now considered to be among his finest works.

Gilbert Parkwalking area

A Bermuda National Park. A small but interesting facility just behind the Gilbert Institute School, off the South Road. It is often overlooked by visitors.

Golf CoursesGolf coursewalking area

Grape Baywalking area

5 star beach South Shore, off South Road, a good mile before you get to Elbow Beach and closer to the City of Hamilton than the latter. Private and superb, arguably the best in Bermuda, for guests of the intimate Grape Bay Cottages, Grape Bay Beach Hotel (formerly White Sands Hotel) and local homeowners in this up-market area. The nearest (private) beach to the City of Hamilton. Unlike many other beaches, never crowded. It once had an earlier name, Crow Lane Bay. It is isolated by rocky stretches of coastline from Hungry Bay to the west and Coco Beach (formerly Elba, then Stonington) and Elbow Beach to the west. The newer name of this beach probably stems from the naturalized Bay Grape (Coccoloba ubifera) that once grew abundantly - and still does to some extent - on the land side of the beach. Bay Grape or Sea Grape is non-endemic, native. A spreading coastal tree growing to 30 feet. Common, growing wild or as a part of hedges. It has large round glossy green waxy leaves 4-8 inches wide with red veining. Female plants pollinated by male plants produce small, white flowers that become grape-like clusters of green fruit that matures to purple. The plant can be pruned to form a single-trunk specimen tree, or clipped into a hedge. When clipped into a screen, the plant makes an effective windbreak. Bay grape is also tolerant of salty conditions, and is often grown in a shrub form to stabilize land near the beach and prevent erosion. The grapes are edible, not pleasant raw and can be made into a superb and distinctively-tasting jelly and jam. In Bermuda, berries ripen from October to December. Considered to have been the main reason for the naming of Grape Bay Beach, in Paget.

Bay Grape tree at Bay Grape Beach

Bay Grape tree at Grape Bay Beach. 2009 Photo by this author exclusively for and copyrighted by Bermuda Online

Grape Bay beach

Grape Bay beach

Harbour Road

The Paget Parish portion on the north side of the Parish is loaded with marvelous seascape views all the way. Buses don't service it because it is too narrow and twisting. The best way to see it is to get on your rented moped -  try not to select the morning and evening rush hours as there are few places to get out of the way of heavy traffic. You won't be able to do full justice to the seascapes. To appreciate them as they deserve, pick a time of day when traffic is light. Or hail a taxi and go towards Warwick Parish. Or pass by on the ferry.

Hodson's Ferry Dock

Harbour Road and Chapel Road, Paget. A ferry stop on the Paget to Hamilton route.  

Horizons & Cottages 4-starDiningMeeting RoomPoolTennispublic bus

Horizons and cottagesDiningMeeting RoomGolfTennispublic bus50 rooms and suites. 

33 South Road & Southcote Roads, Paget Parish PG BX, Bermuda. P. O. Box PG 200, Paget, PG BX, Bermuda. Telephone (441) 236-0048. In USA & Canada 1-(800)-468-0022. Fax (441) 236-6651.

 Prominent local hotelier George A. Wardman is the owner

On an 18th-century hillside plantation on 25 acres of wooded grounds, It first opened as a property for paying guests in the latter part of the 1930s. 

It has its own 9-hole mashie golf course it shares with its sister Coral Beach Club. (Nine 18-hole courses are island-wide). 

The Main House has 9 guest rooms, all with private baths, seating areas, balconies or patios. 

The 14 cottages contain from one to 5 bedrooms each with private bath and breakfast terrace. The Banana Tree cottage is a favorite for honeymooners. Luxurious in service, price and comforts. With access to the private Coral Beach for guests, its own smart-casual restaurants at Ocean or Barbeque Terrace or coat-and-tie Middleton Room, tennis on 3 all-weather courts, freshwater pool, beach facilities within easy walking distance at the superb private beach of the Coral Beach Club sister property owned by the same family. On bus routes 2 and 7.  

Chelsea Clinton, who was married in August 2010, only daughter of former US President and Senator Clinton, is reputed to have been conceived here in the late 1970s.

The golf course closed to the public on July 1, 2010 but Splendido Bar & Restaurant will remain open.

Hungry Baypublic buseswalking area

A lovely Bermuda bay, Bermuda National Park and Nature Reserve. The land part of it has a small but choice private beach to the right of Tribe Road No. 1 which begins at the Peace Lutheran Church and ends south at the sea. Enter the bay at the small public wharf at the bottom (or if you are a resident or friend of one, via Seabright Avenue and then then left on Seabright Lane, straight down to the dock going down to the sea before the lane turns right). 

Hungry Bay beach

One of two Hungry Bay beaches, this one at the very end of Tribe Road

Hungry Bay

Another view of Hungry Bay, from the air, showing Crow Island in the centre of the bay and a second beach to the right (only visible at low tide)

At the top left of the color photo immediately above is the prior-to-1013 King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, now in process of being completely re-built. At the middle right, top, the open-space grounds of the Bermuda Botanical Gardens can be seen. 

The bay is also a lagoon and swamp, a smaller version of the Florida Everglades, more like a series of Louisiana bayous, a part of Bermuda 99% of tourists and locals never see. 

Hungry Bay mangroves

Hungry Bay mangroves 2

Hungry Bay mangroves

In Hungry Bay, turn left at Crow Island and left again to go into the north-east section. Look for a waterway on your right as you face the land. It is a mangrove enclosed opening to the swamp. Enter at your own risk, preferably via someone who knows the swamp and has an aluminum or rubber inflatable dinghy or kayak. (The author himself provided this service until 1989, but not since then). Assist in rowing, paddling and fending off mangrove branches. Swim if the craft overturns or is punctured. Wear old clothing, or swim suit with an old shirt, old sneakers or docksiders. Or go via road and path instead of by water, on a periodic Bermuda Aquarium, Museum & Zoo tour with a volunteer guide.

Mangroves 3hungrybay.jpg (13491 bytes)

You can go for miles up the canals. The best time of day to access the swamp by water is at least an hour before high tide crests. It will help bear you right in. Note native Red Mangroves (Rhizophora mangle), evergreen trees reaching up to 25 feet via numerous aerial roots from lower branches. Their aerial roots, with root systems resembling eggs of gigantic spiders, indicate they are the red variety. Aerial roots act as props to give them plenty of stability. They have air-breathing organs on their prop roots, which carry air to the roots in the salty mangrove swamps where the sediment is poor in oxygen. The prop roots excrete some of the salt the tree brings in. They are seldom torn up by storms or gales and are vital to our coastlines because they stop the shores from eroding. They grow only in mud at the edge of salt lagoons and bays. They have pendulous fruits.

Also see Black Mangroves (Avicennia nitida), gray-foliaged evergreen trees up to 40 feet high with numerous air-breathing roots growing upwards to 6 inches from the mud around the base of the trunk. They grow in the mud of salt lagoons and bays like these, excellent trees for bees and birds. Black mangroves are slightly smaller than the red variety, with breathing roots rising straight from the water. They also supply air to the underwater roots. On the back of their leaves, you may see salt crystals. This is how the tree gets rid of its salt in the water it consumes.

Mangroves are less aggressive than other trees. They cannot compete with trees and shrubs using fresh water, so they have adapted themselves to living in salt water. Hear the red and black mangrove trees and their young ones murmuring, sucking and expelling water. Both types of mangroves have waxy leaves to conserve fresh water.

For the survival of the species, mangrove seeds start growing on the parent tree to ensure they are not lost in the mud at the foot of the tree. Sprouting seeds fall into the water below and find where they can establish roots of their own. This mangrove area provides nurseries for fish and crabs including marine and local, protected land Hermit Crabs, another protected local species of Giant Land Crab (see photograph above of the holes it digs) - more right here than anywhere else in Bermuda - and mangrove crabs, and habitats for a variety of wild fauna. The coffee bean snail is another well-known resident. Young barracuda, snappers and grunts live here, as do adult damselfish, bream, wrasses and parrotfish, some very large. The water is calm and less salty than in the ocean and mangrove leaves provide a good supply of food.

Also in or near beautiful deep water lagoons are nesting birds such as herons and egrets, under their marine forest canopy. Listen to tree frogs at dusk. Elsewhere in Bermuda, their chorus is soothing, but here it is mysterious and sensuous, a mating call indeed, with answers. Mangroves act as sand and soil traps, keeping waters clear and protecting coastlines during storms. When you're ready to leave this tranquil place, the outgoing tide will guide you back to Hungry Bay (lower right).

If you go by land instead of by water, there are some charming coastline areas nearby to explore to the south east. Walk along the cliffs, for superb ocean views (but no beaches). Also in the area, at the entrance to the bay and via a bit of a climb of a cliff for the agile, is the old ruin of Hungry Bay Fort, one of the many tiny coastal batteries used in early colonial days by British Army soldiers to guard Bermuda against invasion by Spain, France and the USA.

Islands

Only those in the Parish are shown here. See other Bermuda Islands.

Burnt Very small, near Salt Kettle. It is named as such from when settlers set fire to its vegetation hundreds of years ago to get rid of great swarms of rats going from island to island.
Crow Hungry Bay
Doctor's Small, in Hamilton Harbor, immediately north of Salt Kettle.
Duck's A mangrove patch at the Foot of the Lane. Aquatic life takes refuge here and during storms or hurricanes small boats take shelter to leeward.
Hinson's Paget Parish (Warwick North Central constituency). Number 16 on the listing of Bermuda National Parks and Reserves. Also known in the past as Brown's or Godet's. An island in the Great Sound. It became the first air base for aircraft in Bermuda. One of the largest in the Great Sound, closer to the Warwick shore than the Paget shore but actually in Paget Parish. It has a convoluted history. It was a Boer War prisoner of war camp from 1901 to 1902, mostly for Boer teenagers. Later, it was the base for Bermuda's first seaplane service, the Bermuda and West Atlantic Aviation Company, run by Major Hal Kitchener and Major Hemming, a veteran of World War I. Now it is an exclusive island - and a private club - for the wealthy, with a request ferry stop on the Warwick service for residents to get to the city of Hamilton and back. Most homes have their own water frontage or private docks or moorings. There are no private automobiles on the island. Ashore, see it best from Harbor Road, at the Belmont Wharf or Darrell's Wharf ferry stops.
Spectacle Also known as Hunt's, north of Hinson's. One of two by this name in Bermuda but the only one in this Parish. In Hamilton Harbor.
White's

White's Island

White's Island. Royal Gazette photo

Paget Parish. Originally Hunt's from the family that once owned many shares in old Bermuda. In the middle of Hamilton Harbor, now the property of the Corporation of Hamilton. Few Bermuda islands have had a more varied history. Most locals and visitors do not know that in the closing months of World War 1 it was sub leased to the United States Navy as an operating base for U boat chasers. An oil painting of the Stars and Stripes on the island's flag pole was painted then by a well known local artist.  The lease lapsed at the end of the war. Has long been a campsite, with permission in advance directly from the Bermuda Government's Department of Youth, Sport and Recreation. Has a small beach. Also from where fireworks are let off periodically, after permission from Government.

King Edward VII Memorial Hospitaldisabledpublic buses

KEMH new

New hospital wing being constructed

Lower Ferry Dock

Harbour Road, Paget. A ferry stop for residents and visitors on the Paget to Hamilton route.

Middle Roadpublic buses

One of the three major roads in Bermuda. It runs through the Parish going west, parallel to South Road and Harbor Road. The single bus route on this road is the #8, from the city via this Parish, west to Sandy's Parish and from there back to the city.

Musson's Point

One of the most prominent features of the Paget shore, thrusting north from Hamilton Harbour, it separates Prudden Bay and Salt Kettle Bay. It was once the site of the original Crow Lane Tribe, once a small village of colonists from Britain in the 1620s. The Musson name overtook a previous name when the Reverend Samuel P Musson became Rector of Paget and Warwick. Musson family members still live in Bermuda.

Paget Marsh Nature Reservepublic buseswalking area

Paget Marsh

Photo Bermuda Department of Tourism

Off Lover's Lane at the Middle Road, or via Valley Road at the Middle Road, this is on accessible private property. There are nearly  26 acres of prime nature reserve, the second largest in Bermuda. The central portion is owned by the Bermuda Audubon Society and the Bermuda National Trust has extensive land on either side. A boardwalk, mostly on Audubon property, a 315 foot attraction, takes visitors over five separate areas. $350,000 of its cost is the gift of American philanthropist and Bermuda resident Dennis Sherwin, a former Bermuda National Trust president. The nature reserve has fine palmetto and cedar trees and a mangrove swamp. A pond in the marsh, near the swamp, funded by Audubon, was filled in with garbage in the 1920 era but re-established to create rare new wetlands for migratory birds. The reserve is the last place on the island where a forest remained intact after colonists first arrived in 1609. But rising sea levels - caused by whirlpools of warm water called gyres -  may be causing the loss over a period of time of up to 70% of the cedar trees. In 2002, sea levels were the highest in Bermuda for 300 years. They have risen 9 inches since 1926 and the rate at which the water is rising has increased every year. Because it is otherwise a safe refuge for endangered trees and plants, please take only photographs and leave only footprints.

A recent addition is the pond, in which attempts have been made, not successful to date, to catch and transfer from Warwick Pond some live specimens of the precious endemic the Killifish (Fundulous bermudae), found in a special tank at the Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo - about 2.5 inches long, with a low dorsal fin, light brown to pale greenish yellow, darker on the ventral surface, with dark, indistinct greenish-brown bands on the sides. Still largely unknown to the general public. First described in 1874 by Gunther. Male and female have slightly different coloring. First illustrated in Beebe and Tee-Van's 1933 "Field Book of Shore Fishes of Bermuda. " A favorite place is a fresh to brackish water pond, especially when fringed with mangroves. 

Paget Parish Council

P. O. Box PG 150. Paget PG BX, Bermuda. Appointed under the Bermuda Government's Parish Councils Act 1971. 

Paget Plazapublic busesShopping

A small but select shopping area, with a food store and a gift store.

Pomander Road

This pretty quiet road is near Trimingham Hill. It winds past the commercial Aberfeldy  Plant Nursery, the car park to the Bermuda National Trust, residences and small select guest houses (see "Accommodation"). It ends at the Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club. It has nice water views of Hamilton Harbor.

Prudden Bay

Nearly encircled by Musson's and Frith's Points, the bay, sometimes also referred to as Pridden Bay, is on the east side of the old village of Salt Kettle. The name comes from a 17th century family who then owned the land. In 1798 the last of the line, Daniel Prudden, a coroner and surveyor was appointed to the post of Customs Watcher ir inspector for the new port of Hamilton - now city of Hamilton. His job required him to live where he could observe shipping in Hamilton Harbour. Later, American artist 

Rebecca Middleton Nature Reserve

Rebecca Middleton Nature Reserve

Ten years after the repeated rape, sodomy, murder and torture in Bermuda - on July 3, 1996 - of Canadian teen Rebecca Middleton, this half acre Paget nature reserve of wooded hillside near Ord Road, on a stretch of the Bermuda Railway Trail, was formally named in her honour on late February 2006. It is owned by the Bermuda National Trust (BNT). It was donated by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Cook. Mrs. Cook’s maiden name is Middleton, and although no relation to Rebecca, she was particularly upset by the case and wished the land to be a permanent memorial. BNT then-president Hugh Davidson said the gift would continue a vision of an ‘Emerald Necklace’ of green spaces throughout the Island.

Restaurants Dining

See Bermuda Cuisine.

Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy ClubDining

Royal Hamilton Amateur Dinghy Club

"Mangroville," 25 Pomander Road, Paget PG 05, or P. O. Box PG 298, Paget PG BX, Bermuda.  Phone (441) 236-2250. Membership required. The second rather nice yacht club in Bermuda, with new members welcome. It is in a superb location overlooking the waters of Hamilton Harbor, with a nice view of the city. Lunch is served daily and dinners are by appointment or for special events. Extensive facilities include 2 tennis courts and facilities for mooring boats, plus a small basic studio unit for upwards of $80 a day for a member or a sailing person recommended by one. 

Salt Kettle, Salt Kettle Baywalking area

In Salt Kettle Bay. So-named from the once- lucrative salt business Bermudians began in the Turks Islands that supplied salt to America and beyond. It was here, then a village, that head-quartered the business. It is near Hamilton Harbor, a peaceful, quiet and up-market place with fine residences, beautiful views and excellent walking. The bay and its land area including Salt Kettle Lane and Salt Kettle Road are particularly attractive when approached by the very convenient Government ferry on the City of Hamilton to Salt Kettle route or when passed on the Warwick ferry from the City of Hamilton to Darrell's Wharf route. There is no direct bus route here as Harbor Road, which provides access to this area, is too narrow. The nearest bus service is the number 8 route and the nearest stop is about a mile away at the Cobb's Hill Road stop at the Paget and Warwick junction. 

Salt Kettle, 1950s

1950s view of Salt Kettle

Salt Kettle Ferry Stop

10 Salt Kettle Road, Paget. A service for residents and visitors on the Paget to Hamilton route. Several hotels and guest houses are close by.

St. Paul's Churchpublic buses

Bermuda graveyard

On Middle Road, the Anglican or Episcopalian parish church. The church has its own graveyard. One particularly ornate grave is that of 1940, November 26, commemorating the death in Bermuda of Harold Sidney Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere, born April 26, 1868, Hampstead, London, England, who died in Bermuda from dropsy at the age of 72. A British newspaper proprietor who, with his brother Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe, built the most successful journalistic empire in British history and created popular journalism in that country. A shy individual, he let his brother handle the public and journalistic side of the business, while he handled financial matters. He is buried in grave 271, a prominent one by itself. In October 1940, Lord Beaverbrook, with the approval of Prime Minister Winston Churchill, sent Harmsworth on a secret war mission to Canada and the United States. Upon the completion of the job, Harmsworth went to Bermuda to take a rest. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Harmsworth,_1st_Viscount_Rothermere#Bibliography which does not mention where his grave is situated.

Seabright Avenue

A quiet, hilly to start with residential road that begins at South Road just west of the Lutheran Church. It has a number of homes, plus a Bermuda Telephone Company substation, Leading off it is Seabright Lane, going down to Hungry Bay. It is not generally known that from the City of Hamilton 3 miles away sewage is not piped from individual houses as is common in USA, Canada, UK, etc. Instead, a pipe pumps the city's raw sewage all the way from the city, under Seabright Avenue, to the Seabright Outfall located south of Hungry Bay. 

Supermarketspublic buses

Fresh fruit

Market Place Group has two stores, the Modern Mart on South Road, bus route 7,  and A-1 Paget on Middle Road, bus route 8. Unlike in the UK and USA, liquor cannot be bought on Sunday. Be prepared and budget in advance for Bermuda food and other prices. Store prices are very high compared to USA. 

Waterville

See under "Bermuda National Trust."

The Wharf Executive Hotel 4 Starship viewpublic ferry

The Wharf

1 Harbour Road, PG 01,  or P.O. Box PG 176, Darrell's Wharf, Paget, Bermuda. Phone 441 232-5700. Large Suites With Free Wi-Fi & Continental Breakfast. With adjacent condominiums, ranging in size from 2-4 bedrooms. Formerly the Palm Reef Hotel.  Before that the famous Inverurie, a huge Bermuda favorite in the 1950s and 60s,  on Hamilton Harbor. Taxi fare from/to airport from $29 per taxi for 1-4 passengers or from $38 for 5-6 passengers. Geared towards the corporate business traveler. Opened on July 10, 2002 as a 15-suite boutique hotel. With office facilities, 24-hour concierge service and kitchens. There is a ferry stop adjacent to the hotel, for a 7-minute ferry ride (when it arrives) to the City of Hamilton 

Other Bermuda geographic areas

City of Hamilton Hamilton Parish Paget Parish Pembroke Parish Sandys Parish
Smith's Parish Southampton Parish St. George's Parish Town of St. George Warwick Parish

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Last Updated: September 10, 2014.
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