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Bermuda's Devonshire Parish

Exploring a historic central main island county located between Paget and Smith's

line drawing

By Keith Archibald Forbes (see About Us) at e-mail exclusively for Bermuda Online

To refer by e-mail to this file use "bermuda-online.org/seedevon.htm" as your Subject

Accommodation

Recommended hotels are shown in bold. Some have the facilities shown by the following symbols. Hotels shown with 5-2 Stars reflect the symbols shown on Expedia.com

Introduction

Devonshire Parish

Part of Devonshire Parish's crest, from that of the First Earl of Devonshire. Used with exclusive permission from the copyright owners. Do not copy.

The Bermuda Government appoints a Parish Council for each Parish. It will have more information about the crest and Parish beyond that shown below.

Devonshire Parish is on Main Island, on the North and South Shore Roads and Middle Road. It is the same size as the other eight parishes. It was named for Bermuda's Elizabethan patron, William Cavendish, First Earl of Devonshire (1552-1626). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Cavendish,_1st_Earl_of_Devonshire

He took his title from the southern English maritime county (Devon, not Devonshire). William Cavendish was the uncle of the Earl of Pembroke. He was born to an enormous fortune. He entered Parliament as the member for Newport in the year of the Armada and remained inconspicuous until the death of Queen Elizabeth 1 and accession of King James. He was given a barony by the King and in 1618 bought his Earldom for a further 10,000 pounds. He was a member of the Council of the Virginia Company of 1612 - which included Bermuda - and Bermuda Company of 1615. He was a gentlemen Adventurer who invested to colonize Bermuda and largest shareholder in the original Cavendish Tribe (Devonshire Parish) in 1619. He never visited Bermuda himself. He died almost unnoticed in 1626.

Ann Cavendish, Lady RichIn January 2009 The Royal Gazette reported that portrait of a woman whose father was governor of the Bermudas Company was expected to be sold for as much as $700,000 at auction. Christie's, in New York, included the 17th century portrait of Anne Cavendish, later Lady Rich, in its Important Old Master Paintings and Sculpture Auction that take place in Rockefeller Plaza on January 28. The painting was done by Anthony Van Dyck, a Flemish Baroque artist and the leading painter of the English courts, most famous for his portraits of King Charles I, and the auction house estimated its value in the range of $500,000 to $700,000.  

His portrait of Anne Cavendish was painted in 1637, during his second stay in England, and just a year before her death and four years before his own. The painting has an illustrious history of ownership, as seen in the details of provenance provided by Christie's, having been owned by among others, Sir Robert Walpole, Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1721 to 1742. Although Anne Cavendish may herself never have visited Bermuda, strong connections to the island can be found in both her family tree and in that of her husband, Robert Lord Rich.  

Anne was born in 1611, daughter of Sir William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Devonshire (1590 to1628), and her grandfather, also Sir William Cavendish, was the 1st Earl of Devonshire one of the grantees of Bermuda and an original member of the "Company of the City of London for the plantation of the Somers Islands".

Devonshire Tribe and Cavendish Fort were named for him and the Earl of Devonshire is said to have owned 245 acres of land in Bermuda by 1663. Her father, the 2nd Earl, continued in the family business and was governor of the Bermudas Company. In 1632, Anne married Robert Lord Rich, the 3rd Earl of Warwick, who also had strong ties to Bermuda. His father, the 2nd Earl of Warwick, was a manager of the Bermudas Company. Warwick Parish was named for him, its crest taken from his own, and it is said that Warwick Academy was built on land donated by the Earl in mid 17th century. Anne died in 1638, at the age of 27, mourned in a poem by Edmund Waller and Sir John Denham: "That horrid word, at once, like lightning spread, struck all our ears the Lady Rich is dead! Heart-rending news! And dreadful to those few who her resemble, and her steps pursue."

 In other Bermuda Parishes - not this one - there are areas with the prefix of Cavendish - also after the Earl. Early settlers referred to Devonshire Tribe as Brackish Pond. It was because of the large marsh in the center. Today, Brackish Pond is Devonshire Marsh. Parts of it are sightseeing attractions for naturalists. 

Bermuda's Architectural Heritage: Devonshire. Trimingham, Andrew. 1995. Bermuda National Trust. The first in a series of illustrated (black and white, not color photos) parish by parish reviews of Bermuda's architecture. Out of print.

Area of the Parish

Devonshire ParishParish area

Constituencies

In the last General Election, each of the following districts has about 1,250 registered voters, covers about 0.58 of a square mile on average and has its own paid Member of Parliament (MP).

Complicating the issue is that not all Parish residents can vote in this Parish's constituency. Some had to vote in other Parish's constituency.

Arboretumwalking area  

Arboretum 01Go via Montpelier Road or Middle Road. At the corner of both. A Bermuda National Park. 

There is scooter and car parking. Open from sunrise to sunset, free to the public. 

No organized gardens or flowerbeds but serene inland setting of 22 acres of open space with a gazebo, tall trees, open meadows,  pathways, shrubs, collections of conifers, palms and genus ficus. 

See Bermuda cedar trees (a unique form of juniper), flowering golden acacias, avocados, acres of cherry forest and rubber trees with hanging tendrils along with many other species. 

Plus, a bird sanctuary noted for cardinals and bluebirds. An ornamental bridge has small pools underneath. Enjoy a picnic here, also a great walking area, with shade trees, accessible by the route 3 bus and a short walk. 

The property has an interesting history. From the mid 19th century, like most of the Parish at the time, it was once - but no longer - part of British Army lands at "Montpelier" nearby - the private house now owned by the Bermuda Government and now lived in by the Deputy Governor. 

In 1962, some years after the British Army left Bermuda, the lands were planted by the Bermuda Government's Department of Agriculture as an arboretum with a specific purpose - to have at least one specimen of all the trees that will grow in Bermuda.

Arboretum photograph by author Keith Forbes

Barn Thrift ShopShopping

Founded in 1964, it is staffed by volunteers from the Hospitals Auxiliary of Bermuda, a registered charity. It has some of the best bargains in Bermuda. Locals and visitors come on a Thursday or Saturday morning from 9 am to 12 noon every week or frequently to find previously owned goods and clothes here at a fraction of the prices of retail stores. In July 2002, it opened new premises, at 5,000 square feet nearly four times the size of the previous area. Madame Helene Frith, a French lady who married a Bermudian and settled here, was one of the founding members. Others were Lady Tucker, Mrs. Brownlow Tucker and Mrs. Walter Staebler. The original Barn opened on April 4, 1964 on The Lagoon South Shore, Paget property of Sir Henry and Lady Tucker. The second Barn was a portable cabin from England and opened in 1986 on Bermuda Government property across from St. Brendan's Hospital. The newest facility adjoins the latter. About $250,000 is raised annually by the Barn from donated goods of all kinds. It has become the leading moneymaker for King Edward VII Memorial Hospital.  Ann Douglas Ross is the Manager and there are about 77 volunteers.

Bermuda Equestrian Centre

About 1.5 miles into Vesey Street, off Middle Road. Established via Bermuda's first-ever Special Development Order in October 1997. Regular Junior International Show Jumping Competitions and other equestrian events occur here. For all interested in ponies, harness racing and scheduled competitive equestrian activities. The facilities include a show ring, stands and parking for patrons and spectators. This is where the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) sometimes stages the annual International Dressage Competition. Bermuda is one of six nations in Group II, the others being Mexico, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Colombia and Peru. Bermuda's riders make a fine showing in the event. 

Bermuda Fortswalking area

Only one remains in this Parish, at Devonshire Bay.

Bermuda National Parkswalking area

There are several, all shown by name below.

Bermuda National Stadium

50 Frog Lane, Devonshire DV 01. Telephone 295-8085. Bermuda Government owned and taxpayer financed. Construction work began several years ago at its complex the Bermuda National Stadium and millions of dollars have been spent. The first international soccer games were played here in early  2001. Cricket, Track and Field, soccer and many other sports are played here.  Mailing address is The Manager, P. O. Box HM 2262, Hamilton HM JX.

Bermuda Police Service Headquarters

Prospect, the former British Army base until the 1950s. Premises include the Police Club, popular with expatriates as a bar and for social events.

Bermuda Railway Trailship viewwalking area

Bermuda Squash Racquets Association Club

At 11 Middle Road, Devonshire DV 06, next to the National Sports Club. Telephone (441) 292-6881. Fax 295 8718. The Junior Program is Bermuda Registered Charity 549. The only place to play squash (racquetball) in Bermuda. Many competitive events are held here, including several involving world class squash personalities.

Brighton Hill Road

This pleasant rural road links the South Road with the Middle Road. En route, it leads to Brighton Hill Nursery, a favorite gardening supply center for many Bermudians and residents; also, via Watlington Road East, to a leading supermarket. On the left at the very bottom, where Brighton Hill Road meets the main Middle Road, is Old Devonshire Church.

British Army remnantsship viewwalking area

Almost no traces remain of how this parish was once the headquarters of the British Army in Bermuda, with not just one but several former forts as the bastion. At one time, more than 75 percent of the parish was compulsorily acquired by the army for military purposes. In 1863, following major improvements in British shore-based British Army gunnery in terms of range and accuracy, Fort Langton was built here as part of the massive British Army deployment plans in Bermuda. It became the only fort ever constructed on the north shore of the main island of Bermuda. Fort Prospect, not a fort per se but with a strategic purpose was the headquarters of major military base, complete with a garrison school. In the 1930s and most of the 1940s, especially for the Garrison, there was a Prospect Halt for the Bermuda Railway. Today, all that is left of the once huge base which even had its own school, church and parade ground are a former British Army hospital, now used as the headquarters of a Ministry of the Bermuda Government, a graveyard (which includes the grave of a British Police Commissioner for Bermuda assassinated in Bermuda by black cadre extremists, and original Officers Mess, now the Police Recreational Club.

British Army former hospital 1 (10464 bytes)British Army former hospital 02 (8000 bytes)Prospect Garrison Cemetery

Bus routespublic buses

The Parish is served by the following routes that go to and from the city of Hamilton. Some routes are much better served than others in frequency and lateness. See the schedule available free from the bus terminal in Hamilton and note its times on Monday to Friday, Saturday, and Sunday & Holiday, as well as where the routes go and do not go in the Parish.

Calvary Prospect Roman Catholic Church Cemetery

Roberts Avenue. Not a place visited by many tourists, a rather grim place in an area outside of the tourist map, but of interest as Bermuda's only Roman Catholic cemetery. Most of Bermuda's Catholics are interred here. It is referred to by local Catholics as Holy Cavalry Cemetery. It is also the final resting place of a Canadian 1st World War soldier, buried there in April 1915. In Bermuda, Catholic churches have never been allowed, unlike Anglican Episcopalian and other non-Catholic churches, to have their own cemeteries. New headstones for many graves were put into place in 2013-2014.

Christ Churchwalking area

On Middle Road, this is the Anglican Parish church, next door to Old Devonshire Church. The church has its own graveyard. In 2008, the once-lovely old Rectory residence, see below in this 1949 photograph by step-daughter Cindy Farnsworth (now Olden) of the Rev. Keith Harman. He was then the Rector of Devonshire and Chaplain to the Prospect Garrison. He was quite a photographer. When he did his tour of duty as Private Chaplain to King George VI in 1951 he took pictures of Windsor, the famous Doll's House, etc.  The Queen liked them so much he had Kodak make special prints from his transparencies which he subsequently sent to Her Majesty! She wrote back to thank him. The building, at 106 Middle Road, Devonshire, was razed to make room for four studios, four one-bedroom apartments and a two-bedroom condo. A new rectory has been built instead.

Christchurch Rectory 1947

Christ Church Rectory 1947 courtesy of Cindy Olden

Cloverdale Pond

A suburban site for bird watching.

Clyde Best Centre of Excellence

Prospect. Since 2013, completed in 2014. A sporting facility. Named in honour of Bermudaís most successful footballer. Adjacent to the BFA Field where the two-storey 4,000 square foot building houses BFA offices on the upper level and changing rooms, a physio room, gym and bathrooms on the lower level.

Devonshire Baywalking area

Devonshire Bay. Photos above and below by the author exclusively for Bermuda Online

Devonshire Bay (1) Devonshire Redoubt

A Bermuda National Park. On Bus route # 1. A scenic attraction well worth visiting.  A nice family-friendly location. Take Devonshire Bay Road off South Road. Stay to the left until the road ends and park begins. There is parking for scooters and cars. A combination of a ruined fort, fortified history, bay, public beach, park for sightseeing, swimming,  and parkland. The beach is the only public one on the South Shore of this Parish. There are little wading pools here and there. The small fort of Devonshire Bay Battery is one of the survivors of once many coastal batteries or forts that stretched the entire length of Bermuda, during the days of the British Army in Bermuda. The park is a safe place to swim, in a tranquil setting, great for a picnic, with shade trees and sea views. Quite often you'll see local fishermen selling their catch. Watch how they filet to order. This is a good place to buy fresh fish straight from a fisherman, if you are staying in a type of place that permits you to cook your own food. It is delicious, far more satisfying than imported fish bought from a grocery store. But be prepared to pay upwards of US$ 9 a pound. 

Devonshire Dockship viewwalking area

Devonshire Dock

Bermuda Tourism photo

Off the main North Shore Road, at the junction with Dock Hill. No public parking. Visit on a Sunday when the road is not nearly as busy as there is too much traffic nearby on other days. It once serviced the ships of the Royal Navy during the War of 1812-14 against the USA. Thousands of seaman and soldiers arrived here, or departed from nearby camps. From nearby potable fresh-water wells were dug by a combination of British Army sappers and miners, locally-recruited labor and the Royal Navy especially for the 1812-14 War against the USA, and carried to the very small vessels alongside or moored offshore in pinnaces in barrels to serve crew and marines. Nowadays, the dock, much improved since those 1812 days, is used for fishing and pleasure purposes by local fishing craft, and other small craft owners.  There's a beautiful view of the North Shore coastline.

Devonshire Marshwalking area

From the Middle Road at the Nationals Sports Club west for a mile and stretching north, this marshy area was the earliest major feature of the Parish and known as Brackish Pond. Because of it, the whole Parish was once unofficially dubbed Brackish Pond. Today, the "pond" part isn't so obvious, partly because of the fact that perimeter parts of the area bordering Middle Road have been reclaimed for farming, light industrial and recreational use. Several areas of Devonshire Marsh have now been designated as the Firefly Nature Reserve and Freer Cox Nature Reserve, both mentioned below. The easternmost end of the marsh was drained years ago to provide the playing fields for the National Sports Club. The Devonshire Marsh suffered a bad fire in December 1996 but recovered well.

Devonshire Parish Council

Appointed under the Parish Councils Act 1971. See under "Parish Councils" in Bermuda Government Boards. Appointees are political and meetings are not open to the public, unlike in the United Kingdom, Canada and USA where parish or community councils always are.

Devon Springswalking area

Number 37 on your Bermuda National Parks and Reserves map available from Bermuda Parks.

Edmund Gibbons Nature Reservewalking area

South Road. A sign points to it. It is just before this road enters Smith's Parish.  You may enjoy seeing it more on a Sunday before the traffic starts getting constant. It's a walking reserve, with no admittance fee.  It has local flora, fauna and migratory birds attracted to the pond and marshlands. It is small but scenic. Please leave only footprints, no trash.

Firefly Nature and Freer Cox Memorial Reserveswalking area

Off Middle Road, across from Old Devonshire Church. It's a 10 acre area of Devonshire Marsh, in these two named sections. They serve as a sanctuary for birds, endangered species of local fauna and a breeding ground for wild orchids. There's no admittance fee. These are especially interesting areas for botanists, entomologists and those who appreciate nature generally. Both Reserves are under the care and protection of the Bermuda Audubon Society and Bermuda National Trust. Please leave only footprints, no trash.

Friendship Vale Parkship viewwalking area

A Bermuda National Park. Number 31 on your Bermuda National Parks and Reserves map. This is a very small but pretty hillside park at the junction of Parsons Lane with Palmetto Road. If you rent a moped, it's the perfect vantage point from which to begin to explore a rural part of Bermuda. Head south, down Parsons Lane. At the junction, either stay on Parsons Lane until you reach the Middle Road, or veer to the right on Orange Valley Road. Enjoy the hedge rows, country lane atmosphere, small byways, small homesteads and farms, and a rural life fast disappearing in Bermuda.

Garthowen Parkwalking area

A Bermuda National Park. Number 34 on your Bermuda National Parks and Reserves map.

Golfship viewGolf coursewalking area

The above file gives details of local golf courses, all quite close. But this Parish has a good one, below.

Kaleidoscope Arts Foundation

Jubilee Road, in the old Elliott School building owned by Christ Church, Devonshire. Includes the Elliott Art Gallery. The original Elliott School was built in 1848 by 12 black men as a school  for young black children of the parish. It became a monument to the vision of the builders, a symbol of black pride and a slice of Bermuda's rich history. 

LinkBermuda, formerly Cable & Wireless

LinkBermuda formerly Cable and WirelessOn the hilltop overlooking both Middle Road and North Shore Road, west of Store Hill. 

A prominent landmark of satellite dishes on Middle Road, with a number of apartments near Cable Hill, originally built in the 1970s or so to house expatriate Cable and Wireless staff, later rented out to them and others. 

On February 23, 2011 it was announced by Cable & Wireless Communications Plc of London that the Middle Road, Devonshire-based Cable and Wireless operations in Bermuda, operated by C&W since 1890 had been sold for a reported $70 million to Canadian cable company, the Bragg Group. 

The operations comprise Cable and Wireless (Bermuda) Holdings Ltd (CWBH); Cable and Wireless Bermuda Ltd; Cable & Wireless eBusiness Ltd; and its 40 percent shareholding in Quantum Communications Ltd. 

Cable & Wireless, now renamed LinkBermuda by Bragg, had been operating in Bermuda for 121 years. 

Bragg operates under the Eastlink brand in Canada, where it was the first company to offer was the first Canadian cable company to offer commingled (telecom, internet and video services) to customers. 

Cable & Wireless Bermuda's operations were previously part of Cable & Wireless Communications' Channel Islands and Isle of Man business unit. Those management support and certain support services from Guernsey and London have been repatriated to Bermuda. 

Bragg now provides via LinkBermuda former C&W telecom, internet and e-commerce services in Bermuda. It was C&W which in 1890 with its telegram cable system and radio systems first connected Bermuda to the rest of the world.

Mayflower

Mayflower 01Historic house, private property, not usually open to the public but has been part of Bermuda Homes and Gardens program. 15 Middle Road, Devonshire Parish. Owned by Mr. and Mrs. William CoxCompleted in 1893 by William J. Cox, it is an outstanding Victorian interpretation of a traditional Bermuda house. Characteristic of the era are high ceilings, wide verandahs, three-storey tower and widow's walk. The handsome doors, windows and floors are Bermuda cedar or imported solid pitch pine which was more highly valued than cedar at the time because of its scarcity. At the end of a long drive through spacious grounds, Mayflower looks out on a pool and to the South Shore beyond. . A charming historic Bermuda house which in May 2009 hosted the Garden Club of Bermuda's gala party in the grounds as part of its celebration of Bermuda's 400th anniversary. The event, appropriately entitled 'Mayflower in Bloom', allowed allow residents and visitors to enjoy the fine collection of furniture and paintings in the home, as well as the many beautiful floral displays created especially for the occasion by skilled Garden Club members. The gracious residence is the home of William (Bill) and Rosanna Cox, and was built in the late 19th century by William Cox, an ancestor of the present owner. It was also the home of Freer Cox, a founding member and the first president of the Garden Club of Bermuda. Among its furnishings are several items made by the present owner from Bermuda cedar cut from the property, as well as paintings by Mrs. Cox's son, well-known artist Henry Ward. A special feature of the house is the three-storey tower which includes a widow's walk so-called because this is where a wife would wait, often in vain, for her husband to return from the sea. Saturday's visitors will be invited to climb up and see both the North and South Shores. 'Mayflower' sits in ten acres of grounds which were the scene of a host of garden-related activities. The several garden areas include a nice grouping at the front of the property and more flowers and plants by the pool with a view of the South Shore.

May 2002 photo by the author exclusively for Bermuda Online

Mid Atlantic Wellness Institute (MAWI) disabled

Mid Atlantic Wellness Institute

2013. November 20. The Bermuda Hospitals Board will consider bringing Mid-Atlantic Wellness Institute (MAWI) services to King Edward VII Memorial Hospital. The suggestion was one of several made recently by the SAGE Commission, who said the MAWI site could be sold off rather than spending $40 million to renovate the Devonshire facility. A spokeswoman for the BHB said: "The board is looking at every way it can to run more efficiently while maintaining safe, quality services. MAWI is an ageing facility and a recent review of the MAWI estate estimates that a $40 million investment would be needed over time to maintain and upgrade its infrastructure and ensure it can continue operating as a psychiatric facility. We are currently reviewing the delivery of BHB services, and our Senior Management Team and Board will certainly consider the opportunities in consolidating the two sites in more detail as part of this process." The SAGE Commission Report, released on Friday said: Duplicated services are provided at the King Edward VII Memorial Hospital and at MAWI because the two facilities are operated on two separate sites. Substantial savings would be generated from operating both facilities on one site. It also suggested the BHB examine the possibility of erecting a new building adjacent to the acute care centre already under construction to house both psychiatric services and continuing care facilities for the elderly.

St. Brendan's Hospital Until 12th May 2005, St. Brendan's Hospital. On 28 April 1841, the Bermuda Legislature passed an "Act for the Safe Custody of Insane Persons charged with Offences. " It was the first local legislation to deal specifically with persons with mental problems. Persons charged, if found insane, were kept in custody until they went to an asylum. In 1846, a further Act was passed to establish a hospital for the reception of "insane paupers." It enabled the Governor, Lieutenant Colonel William Reid, to buy land in a central parish for an asylum. Seven acres of land on the North Shore were  acquired for 400 pounds sterling and two cottages were built for £600 sterling. The Governor had to approve admissions and discharges to the asylum and in which categories incoming people were, as a lunatic or insane person or idiot or pauper or person of unsound mind. Dr. Henry Josephus Hinson, a graduate of Edinburgh Medical School in Scotland, was the first medical superintendent for the new Lunatic Hospital in 1848. It remained in its original location for 22 years until it moved to its present location in 1868, the site of the former Devonshire College. 

Later, under Governor General Sir John Lefroy, the Devonshire College buildings were expanded after he convinced Parliament to spend £3,650 sterling to pay for additional work. A much larger facility was required from the beginning of the 20th century, especially during and after the two world wars. St. Brendan's became its official name, after the Irish saint born about 484 AD. There is a legend that he sailed across the Atlantic Ocean and that there was a St. Brendan's Island. (A local doctor - Dr. Juanita Guishard - wrote a book about it - Legend of St. Brendan's, published by the University of Toronto Press, and speculates it might have been Bermuda). 

At one time, local nurses only were employed, trained mostly in England. Then nurses were brought in from Britain and the Caribbean. In the early 1970s, management passed from the Department of Health to the Bermuda Hospitals Board under the Ministry of Health. Today, this is the only mental, or psychiatric, hospital in Bermuda, a therapeutic institution that has clinical programmes to address different specialties of mental health services. Currently at MWI, there are four psychiatrists on staff, all of whom are non-Bermudian, in addition 70 percent of the in-patient nursing staff are also foreigners. It has 68 inpatient beds, 28 of which are allocated to the acutely ill and with the other 40 for long-stay clients. About 800 persons in Bermuda are actively involved at some level as outpatient clients, The in-house Petting Zoo and Plant Garden here (the second hospital in Bermuda, the other a general one) is of interest. Its New Dimensions Centre  recreational therapy department draws on a gentle and innovative form of therapy for people who are depressed or schizophrenic or with learning or physical disabilities, or who have had experience in or grown up with animals. A wheelchair ramp and seating area have been built in the open-air courtyard. Huts have been constructed for animals, for clients of the hospital to feed the animals, sweep the area, tidy up,  plant and weed the garden, water herbs and vegetables. Many local businesses have contributed animals or materials. Currently, the facility includes 4 rabbits, 4 guinea pigs, 2 hamsters, 12 chickens, 10 parakeets,  a talking parrot, 2 finches and 1 turtle. Able visitors are also welcome if they have an interest in the less fortunate.

The institution has maintained its accreditation from the Canadian Council of Accreditation since 1970 and has also been accredited by The Royal College of Psychiatrists in the United Kingdom, to serve as a teaching hospital for junior doctors training to become Consultant Psychiatrists. "Bermuda is way ahead of the game in terms of service delivery. We are not behind at all, we are very much in the cutting edge when it comes to our service," she said. It changed its name from St. Brendan's Hospital to Mid-Atlantic Wellness Institute in 2005 for several reasons, to truly represent the services it offers as not just a hospital but a place with many community programmes. It runs group homes and clinics and does a lot of outreach and educational presentations. It is not just an in-patient treatment centre but offers a new beginning to help destigmatise the issues surrounding mental illness. 

Middle Roadpublic buses

This Parish's portion of this central main road begins about half a mile east of the city of Hamilton and continues east for several miles en route to Smith's Parish. It is on the # 3 bus route. If you try to stay off this road during peak rush hours of 4:30-5:45 pm. you'll enjoy the many sights along the way. Look at the architecture of homes and how proud Bermudians are of their gardens. You'll pass by the southern side of Devonshire Marsh on your left, Old Devonshire Church on your right, then the National Sports Club and Bermuda Squash Club. A little further east, you'll cross into Smith's Parish.

National Equestrian Center

See under Bermuda Equestrian Centre

National Sports Centre

National Sports Centre50 Frog Lane, Devonshire DV 01. Telephone 295-8085. Mailing address is The Manager at P. O. Box HM 2262, Hamilton HM JX. An agency of the Bermuda Government since the 1960s. The responsibility of the Ministry, which runs the National Sports Centre (INSC), is to promote and support leisure and sporting activities in Bermuda. It has a  National Sports Centre Trustees Board under the National Sports Centre Trustees Act 1988. Appointed by the Minister of Community Affairs and Sport. Bermuda Government owned and taxpayer financed. The site of the old Bermuda National Stadium which was built in the 1960s then demolished in 2007 to make way for the NSC. 

Until the 1950s the entire area of the NSC did not exist. Instead, it was a field, training ground and military parade and march-past centre of the British Army in Bermuda and part of the operating headquarters of the formidable Fort Prospect Garrison constructed there. In/from the 1860s, the British Army took over a huge section of the entire Devonshire Parish area to safeguard Bermuda from any possible threat from the USA or elsewhere.

Millions of dollars have been spent by the Bermuda Government to bring it up to international standards. It included construction of a  multi-purpose sport field. Facilities include undercover seating for 2,000 spectators, numbered seats,  a timing booth for track and field events, a three-section press box for local and international media, two concession stands, changing rooms, bathrooms and auditorium for large concerts and musical events. The first international soccer games were played here in early 2001. Other sports played here include cricket and rugby. 

By autumn 2012, the long-awaited Aquatics Centre at the National Sports Centre (NSC), complete with 50-metre pool, diving pool and therapeutic facilities, should be up-and-running. The multi-million dollar project, which has been in the pipeline for several years, would reflect the needs of the whole community, not just those of the Islandís elite athletes. The vision for the Aquatic Centre, the only 50 metre pool on the Island upon completion, is a community-centric facility that offers a range of aquatic opportunities, including swimming, diving, water polo and synchronized swimming, capable of hosting both national and international events. The new centre would eventually be brought under one umbrella along with the NSCís other facilities which include a track and field stadium, cricket field and artificial hockey pitch.

National Sports Centre 1

National Sports Centre 2

National Sports Centre 3

National Sports Centre 4

In October 2009 it was announced that plans for an Olympic-size swimming pool at the National Sports Centre were available for the public to view. The Trustees of the Bermuda National Centre applied and got for planning permission for the project here. Phase One of the Aquatic Complex features a 50-metre swimming pool, diving platform, 279 spectator grandstand, temporary changing facilities, temporary surface parking and mechanical support areas. Government first announced plans for the Olympic-size pool during the 2008 Throne Speech. Sports Minister Glenn Blakeney announced $15 million of funding, saying once planning permission is granted, the complex would go out to tender with an expected construction period of two years. The hope - now realized - is to get the outdoor aquatics centre open for the 2013 Island Games. Private sector funding was expected to make up any shortfall. Architect Cooper and Gardner's plans for the complex were made available for public view at the Department of Planning. The plans include a 36ft high diving platform featuring five boards, plus four additional springboards. A scoreboard and 60ft lighting are to illuminate the sporting fixtures. In the changing rooms, a family area is proposed plus male and female changing rooms, each housing 137 lockers. 

North Shore Roadpublic busesship view

This main coastal road runs east to west, on the 10 and 11 bus routes.

Ocean View Golf Course

Ocean View Golf2 Barker's Hill Road, Devonshire Parish DV 05. P. O. Box DV 358, Devonshire DV BX. Phones: Office 295-9092 (fax 295-9097); Pro Shop 295-9093; Tee Times 234-4653; Golf Pro 296-3917; Maintenance 236-6758; Restaurant/Bar 295-9069. E-mail oceanview@bermudagolf.bm. In June 2006, the Bermuda Government's House of Assembly passed an Act that switched responsibility for the Government golf courses from the Ministry of Works & Engineering to Tourism.

A 9 hole par 35 course over 2,819 yards. 

It is not generally known by most Bermudians or golfing visitors that the site of one of the units of the clubhouse here was once a grand old manor house known as Watlington House, now used as a storage facility. It was used for British Army purposes during World War 2. The former Fort Langton and part of its structure were used as the foundations for the clubhouse after the war and more of the former fort became the bus garage in the 1970s. On the field below the bus garage, now the golf course, were two US Army posts during World War 11. One was a unit of the US  Army Signal Corps and the other was the US Army's Artillery, at APO 856. It was a unit (including 1st Platoon Battery A)  of the 423rd Field Artillery Group, under the command of Captain F. W. Clipper, US Army.

For visitors who arrive at the airport on one of the commercial airlines or cruise ships, the closest cruise ship berth is the City of Hamilton, about three miles away to the east. If you bring your own clubs, you won't be able to go by public transportation (bus).  Instead, take a taxi. Buses only go a part of the way. Check rates directly with course depending on time of day and time of year. Public. Ask about playability on the day you have in mind. 

Old Devonshire Churchwalking area

On the Middle Road, at the junction with Brighton Hill Road. It is next door to the Anglican (Episcopalian) parish church. On Sundays, Holy Communion is at 8.00 am and Matins and Sermon are at 11.00 am. It was originally built in 1624, although the present foundations date from 1716 when it replaced a place of worship that blew down in a hurricane. The church silver plate was manufactured in 1590, was enraged with the Tudor rose and brought to Bermuda later, especially for the original church. There was extensive restoration done after a mysterious fire, by an arsonist on Easter Sunday night in 1970. It was reconstructed afterwards. The interior, especially the "ship's knees" construction of thereof, shows how local church builders used many of the techniques used by ship builders of the period, suggesting both were in in this trade also. There is also some most interesting other Bermuda cedar woodwork including the alter screen, carved with hearts and fleur de lys that symbolize love and purity with an aromatic scent. 

Orange Valleywalking area

A Bermuda National Park. Also, an historical house, by the same name, is nearby.

Palmetto Housewalking area

Palmetto House 2

Palmetto HouseOn the North Shore Road. This lovely, 300 year old house, an architectural gem, has been restored at a cost of over Bd$1 million  to its 18th century splendor by the Bermuda National Trust as a good example of Bermudian architecture that had its origins in Britain. Its architecture has the cruciform structure and grand "welcoming arms" staircase. During World War II, it served as a clubhouse for British troops stationed at nearby Fort Prospect. Palmetto House is owned by the Bermuda National Trust and for over 40 years was leased out as a private residence by Wing Commander Mo Ware and his wife Sylvia Ware. He was former Director of Civil Aviation.  Until cleared away the property also "housed" the remains of Ware's old Luscombe airplane (see Bermuda Aviation).  It is open to the general public on a limited basis. The last member of the family to own the property was Benjamin Williams, an overseer of the roads, church warden, choirmaster and organist at Devonshire Church. The house was built around 1700 by Captain William Williams who settled in Bermuda in 1634. The last member of the family to own the property was Benjamin Williams, an overseer of the roads, church warden, choirmaster and organist at Devonshire Church. It was acquired from the family by the British Army in 1868, appropriated by the War Department for inclusion in the Prospect Garrison and in 1868 was taken for single officers' quarters. It later became the club house for the Garrison Golf Course but deteriorated over the following decades. In 1948 Historical Monuments Trust founder Hereward Watlington acquired a lease out of concern at the property's rundown condition. He spent the next few years restoring it, undoing the military's alterations and facilitating replacement fittings from other properties on the Island. With the completion of the Trust's renovations, initiated in December 2008, the property is now available for rent. It has been renovated as a commercial rental to generate revenue for the National Trust. Sought is a tenant who will respect the historic value of the home and the sensitive renovations that have taken place. It is a large enough property for a small family. During the extensive renovation work the floors, roofs and beams were retained as far as possible. Old windows were also patched rather than replaced. The Trust has aimed, as much as possible, to repair rather than to renew, and to remove past inferior work. Rental expected in October 2009 was $9,500 a month, on a lease.. It has a formal dining room, state-of-the-art kitchen with access to a private courtyard, spacious living room with exposed wood beams and a wood burning fireplace, and powder room on the ground floor; master suite with a fire place and a master bath with his and hers sinks and a toll top tub;  two additional bedrooms share a full bath situated on the second level of the home and there are attractive and expansive gardens offering a sanctuary for children to roam free. The 2,050-square-foot property has a separate guest cottage, and views over the North Shore.

Palmetto Parkship viewwalking area

A Bermuda National Park. A small, pleasant, grassy, open park, with mature palm, palmetto and casuarina trees, at the junction of and in between the North Shore and Palmetto Roads. It's very hilly, with an almost 45 degree slope. It offers choice views of the North Shore ocean. There are no facilities in this park, nor is there any admittance fee. It's more a place to linger for a few minutes to enjoy the view, or for a brief picnic. But not during morning or evening rush hours when the sounds of traffic on both roads will destroy the peace.

Palm Grove Gardensdisabledwalking area

Palm Grove

Palm Grove Gardens

South Road. Managed by Gibbons Management Services Ltd, P. O. Box HM 1194, Hamilton HM EX, phone 295-0022, fax 292-1277. The 18+ acres of gardens are open Monday through Thursday. They have lovely South Shore views. Residents and visitors often have their wedding pictures taken here. There is an aviary of tropical birds - parrots - and are open year round, with free admission. The Waterworth family built Palm Grove and it was their family until the death of the patriach in the late 1940's after which it was sold it to the Gibbons family of merchants, bankers and former legislators (one was a Premier and another was the former Minister of Finance). Be sure to see the Bermuda Moon gate and map in a pond. The house and gardens were featured in a recent Bermuda Homes and Gardens event.

Palm Grove Gardens (1)Palm Grove 2

Palm Grove 5Palm Grove 6

4 photos immediately above by author Keith A. Forbes

Prospect Garrison

Long since gone, but the name remains as as a one-time reminder of Bermuda's long British Army military history. Prospect Garrison was the headquarters, with many buildings as barracks for men and houses for officers. What is now the Bermuda Police HQ and Club was originally an Army base HQ and Officers' Mess, respectively. Cedar Park once nearby was the name of an old Bermuda house on Cedar Park Lane. The British Army acquired it and many other properties and roads or streets when it assumed control in the 1850s over most of Devonshire Parish when the local population was only a small fraction of what it is now per capita. Since then, virtually all traces of the British Army's presence in Bermuda have long gone, having made way for development and much redevelopment including for Bermuda Police HQ and buildings, National Sports Centre, a secondary school, playing fields and to generally help reduce to some degree Bermuda's chronic affordable housing shortage to accommodate 68,400 people in only 21 square miles. 

Restaurants in the ParishDining

See Bermuda Cuisine

Roberts Avenue

A street chiefly notable for being the place of the Cavalry Prospect Roman Catholic Church Cemetery in Bermuda, the only RC cemetery on the island. 

Robinson Bayship view

A Bermuda National Park. Just a little west of Palmetto Park, on the North Shore Road, this is another little beach at low tide and coastline park, with no facilities. But you can observe early morning marine traffic, such as cruise ships en route to or from the city of Hamilton. Avoid it during rush hours. For those with an enquiring mind, this place has a fascinating social and naval history. It takes its name from a once-white-in-complexion and aristocratic family by the name of Robinson. Sir Robert Robinson was appointed by the monarch in the United Kingdom as Governor of Bermuda and arrived in 1687 as the first royally-appointed governor after the dissolution of the Bermuda Company governors, having relieved the last of that ilk, Richard Coney. Robinson is believed to have returned to England later, but by himself, not with his English wife whom he deserted. Another Robinson family was started, with the same sire but  instead, his black Bermudian mistress. From them sprang a prominent local family. In the early 19th century the Robinson's operated a store here. When the 1812-14 War against the USA started, the once-quiet cove became an exclusive private beach for officers of the Royal Navy and their equivalents in the British Army who later sailed from Bermuda and whose exploits included torching and looting the White House in Washington, DC. There are still signs here of such military use, such as steps carved into the water and old changing huts made from thick local limestone. They then owned Seven Wells and were the operators of the water wells from that property that supplied the British fleet that attacked and burnt the White House in Washington, DC. In 1815, when the British returned to Bermuda from that campaign they brought with them looted pieces of furniture from the White House, some of which were sold to the Robinsons. 

Ruth Seaton James Centre for the Performing Arts

Cedarbridge Academy, 1 Cedarbridge Lane, Devonshire. Phone 296-5665.

South Roadpublic buses

On the # 1 bus route. The Devonshire Parish part of this main road going east to west is short but scenic. Going east, it begins just before the junction with Tee Street and proceeds towards Smith's Parish. On the way, you'll see the entrance to Ariel Sands on your right, the junction with Brighton Hill Road to the left, then Devonshire Bay Road on the right. You'll also pass the entrances to Palm Grove Gardens and the Edmund Gibbons Nature Reserve on your right before you come to the junction with Collector's Hill to the left with its small churches, and shopping center to the right. At this point, continuing east, South Road quits Devonshire Parish and becomes part of Smith's Parish.

The Laurels

On Middle Road. Government-owned. When she was Premier from November 1998 to July 25, 2003, Jennifer M. Smith, JP, Member of Parliament for the Town of St. George, lived here, rent free, at taxpayers' expense. 

United States of America Consulate General

"Crown Hill," 16 Middle Road, Devonshire DV 03, Bermuda. P. O. Box HM 325, Hamilton HM BX. The consulate for visiting Americans (more than 85% of all Bermuda's visitors are from the USA) and others with legitimate business. Telephone (441) 295-1342. Fax (441) 295- 1592. See connections between Bermuda and USA. Following bombings of US embassies in Africa and the Middle East, the US Congress mandated that Bermuda's US Consulate General should be similarly upgraded in security standards. The Bermuda facility has a nine-foot high perimeter wall/fence; a vehicle barrier and access control center at the entrance gate; hardened interior walls around the building; and installation of blast-proof windows. Additionally, there is a secure Controlled Access Center (CAC) building for most routine work, but in the shape of a Bermuda cottage.

Vesey Street

Off Middle Road, near the Teleport Terminal. Named after an old Bermudian family. For the first half mile or so, this street is mostly residential. Then it becomes more country like. See many examples of Bermuda's endemic trees growing on the southern side of the road, on the northern edge of the Devonshire Marsh bordered by the road. Keep going, for the Winifred Gibbons MBE Nature Reserve and on the right the National Equestrian Center. 

Winifred Gibbons Nature Reservewalking area

About a mile into Vesey Street, off Middle Road. This 2 acre site was established in 1993 in honor of the late Winifred Gibbons, businesswoman and philanthropist, Member of the British Empire, of the prominent local Gibbons family. Like other reserved areas of the Devonshire Marsh, it serves as a sanctuary for birds, endangered species of local fauna and a breeding ground for indigenous trees and wild orchids. It is another especially interesting place for botanists, entomologists and those who appreciate nature generally. It is under the care and protection of the Bermuda Audubon Society and Bermuda National Trust.

Other Bermuda geographic areas

City of Hamilton Hamilton Parish Paget Parish Pembroke Parish Sandys Parish
Smith's Parish Southampton Parish St. George's Parish Town of St. George Warwick Parish

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Last Updated: August 30, 2014.
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